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Posts Tagged ‘B vitamins’

Vitamin B12- Good for your Libido!

Wednesday, September 18th, 2013

Does loss of libido get you down?  Is your sex drive too low? You may need to increase your uptake of vitamin B12, which promotes a healthy libido and provide numerous other benefits that help to sustain your sex organs.  Here are some ways that vitamin B12 and other essential B vitamins can boost your libido and increase energy!

Vitamin B12- Good for your Libido!

Boost your Metabolism with Vitamin B12

B vitamins help to regulate your sex organs; vitamin B12 and other essential B-complex vitamins impact the number of sex hormones released by the body and also promote good fertilization for couples wishing to plan a family.

Each specific B vitamin offers your body something different in regard to your overall health as well as your sex health.

Vitamin B12

Vitamin B12 deficiency is directly linked with a decrease in sex drive, depression, and difficulty conceiving a baby, so it makes sense to increase vitamin B12 and other B vitamins when your libido is sagging.

Vitamin B12 protects and maintains the nervous system, and enhances intercellular communication. All this adds up to a quick and direct response to sexual stimuli. In contrast, people with low vitamin B12 levels have slow, sluggish reflexes.

Vitamin B12 also aids in fertility, as we have seen many males suffering from vitamin B12 deficiency who complain of impotence.

Vitamin B12 aids digestion and absorption of food, which in turn results in more energy and a healthy libido.

Hence, lack of libido and a diminished sex life could be the consequence of a depleted level of vitamin B12.

Lethargy and fatigue are common symptoms of a Vitamin B12 deficiency.  This in turn leads to “sex deprivation” — because the body needs more sleep and rest, not sex.

Vitamin B1

Vitamin B1 is important to keep the nerves finely tuned ensuring optimal transmission of signals for appropriate responses. It enhances circulation, which allows blood to flow not only to your heart but below the belt as well.

This B vitamin also boosts energy levels and optimizes healthy brain functioning. It also has antioxidant affects, which can protect our bodies from aging.  The younger we feel and look, the more confident and sexy we are.

Vitamin B2

Vitamin B2 assists with the metabolism of carbohydrates, fats and proteins in maintaining a healthy weight. It facilitates the use of oxygen by the tissues of our hair, skin and nails keeping us looking young, vibrant and sexy. How’s that for a libido booster?

Vitamin B3

Vitamin B3 increases the blood flow to the skin and nerve endings.  This is in itself a form of stimulus.  For women, this can increase the libido exponentially.  Vitamin B3 generates healthy skin and proper circulation, which can actually help to enhance tactile sensations, lending more excitement to intimate touch.  Additionally, the synthesis of sex hormones is affected by Vitamin B3, and can help to lower bad cholesterol.

Vitamin B5

Vitamin B5 affects the production of the adrenal hormones. Stress reduction is aided by Vitamin B5, and we can all agree that less stress can help put you in the right mood.  Without proper adrenal function, your stamina may be lowered; libido may be reduced, which may make one feel more stressed.  Furthermore, you sweat more profusely with very little physical activity, which can be a sexual turn off for many.

Vitamin B6

Vitamin B6 is an effective libido enhancer, particularly for women. It can aid in the reduction of symptoms of PMS. It also acts as a mild diuretic. Feeling bloated, or moody, can really ruin the atmosphere for intimacy, so make sure you’re getting enough vitamin B6!

Vitamin B6 and vitamin B12 help to reduce cholesterol by protecting the heart muscle from a chemical called homocysteine, which leads to heavy cholesterol deposits.

A healthy heart reduces your chances for sex problems such as low libido and erectile dysfunction, so include lots of libido-healthy B vitamins in your daily diet!

Please tell us…

Do you have any questions or suggestions?  Please leave your comments below.

Share with your friends!

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Like this? Read more:

Vitamin B12 and Fertility

Babies, B12, and Fertility- B12 Deficiency during Pregnancy

Will Vitamin B12 Boost Energy if I don’t have B12 Deficiency? YES!

Image courtesy of Ambro/freedigitalphotos

I Eat Healthy…So How did I Get Vitamin B12 Deficiency?

Tuesday, June 11th, 2013

 

 

Many people who are diagnosed with vitamin B12 deficiency are surprised to learn that their vitamin B12 levels have been plummeting for years, despite exercising and following a healthy low-fat diet. Here are some risk factors for vitamin B12 deficiency, and warning symptoms that many doctors overlook.

I Eat Healthy…So How did I Get Vitamin B12 Deficiency?

Nearly half of the American population has some form of vitamin B12 deficiency, and most don’t even realize it…

Only after you go to the doctor for symptoms of tiredness, depression, memory loss, or painful numbness, and are told after taking a blood test that your vitamin B12 levels have been dropping steadily for several years does B12 deficiency finally come under the radar.

Also read: Is Vitamin B12 Deficiency a Crisis?

Why does vitamin B12 deficiency happen?

There are many risk factors for vitamin B12 deficiency, but for the most part, they can be broken down by 1) diet, and 2) vitamin B12 malabsorption.

Vitamin B12 deficiency from diet

Two out of three people diagnosed with vitamin B12 deficiency aren’t getting enough in their diets.

Vitamin B12 occurs naturally in animal-based foods, such as meat, poultry, fish, and dairy products. As a result of low-fat and vegan dieting, many of the foods that are highest in vitamin B12 have all but disappeared from the average American diet.

How often do you consume the following B12-rich foods?

  • Clams
  • Oysters
  • Crab
  • Halibut
  • Organ meats (liver, heart, kidneys)
  • Lean beef

If you follow a vegan or vegetarian diet…

If you have been advised to shun beef in favor of low-fat turkey and chicken (which have very small amounts of vitamin B12)…

Or if you consume mostly restaurant or processed foods, then you aren’t getting nearly enough vitamin B12 in your diet to prevent severe depletion by the time you reach your 30s and 40s.

Vitamin B12 malabsorption

Another third of people who suffer from severe vitamin B12 deficiency are unable to digest the nutrient efficiently from food sources.

So, even if you eat plenty of meat and fish- and even in you take regular vitamin B12 pills- you may still develop potentially life-threatening and debilitating vitamin B12 deficiency symptoms, if you fall into any of these qualifying risk factors:

  • You are over the age of 50, so unable to produce enough stomach acids to break down vitamin B12
  • You have a family history for pernicious anemia
  • You have autoimmune disorders, including an intrinsic factor antibody that occurs with pernicious anemia, preventing you from absorbing vitamin B12
  • You have had stomach or intestine surgeries, either for weight loss, treatment of ulcers, or Crohn’s disease
  • You have some form of atrophic gastritis
  • If you suffer from fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, migraines, celiac, or other commonly comorbid conditions

What Causes Vitamin B12 Malabsorption?

Signs of vitamin B12 deficiency

Untreated, vitamin B12 deficiency can lead to severe nerve damage, increased risk for heart attack and stroke, bone loss, dementia, clinical depression, and rarely, death.

Here are some often overlooked signs that may indicate vitamin B12 deficiency:

  • Depression
  • Constant fatigue
  • Anxiety
  • Restlessness
  • Hallucinations
  • Short-term memory loss
  • Disorientation
  • Brain fog
  • Confusion
  • Headache
  • Tinnitus (ear ringing)
  • Painful numbness and tingling in the hands and feet
  • Muscle weakness and spasms
  • Burning mouth syndrome
  • Sore, red smooth tongue
  • Difficulty controlling arm and leg movements
  • Frequent falling and dropping things

Top Ten Signs of a Vitamin B12 Deficiency

Treatment

Doctors recommend at least 1,000-2,000 mcg doses of vitamin B12, taken as needed- once monthly or weekly, depending on the severity of symptoms.

Since vitamin B12 is a water-soluble nutrient, it is perfectly safe to take as much as you need in order to replenish vitamin B12 levels and alleviate symptoms that occur with vitamin B12 deficiency.

For optimum absorption and effectiveness, patients should use non-dietary vitamin B12 supplements that are secreted directly into the bloodstream, and do not require swallowing or digestion through the stomach.

Your turn!

Do you have any questions or suggestions?  Please leave your comments below.

Share with your friends!

If you found this article helpful, then please share with your friends, family, and coworkers by email, twitter, or Facebook.

Like this? Read more:

Shocking Must-See Video on Vitamin B12 Deficiency Crisis

Is Vitamin B12 Deficiency a Real Illness?

Sources:

B12: The Beautiful Molecule

Image courtesy of Ambro/freedigitalphotos

Vitamin B12, for Hearing and Heart Health

Monday, June 3rd, 2013

 

 

Have you checked your Vitamin B12 levels lately? When vitamin B12 goes down, homocysteine levels go up, increasing your risk for heart attack, stroke, and hearing loss problems such as tinnitus.

Vitamin B12, for Hearing and Heart Health

Countless scientific studies have shown a high correlation between vitamin B12 deficiency and tinnitus ear ringing.

But what many patients of vitamin B12 deficiency don’t realize- because their doctors haven’t warned them- is that in addition to hearing problems, their risk for heart disease, and stroke are also higher, due to a common denominator of vitamin B12 deficiency- elevated homocysteine.

What is homocysteine?

Homocysteine is an amino acid that we produce when we digest methionine, an amino acid that occurs naturally in meat and dairy products.

An overabundance can have toxic effects on your system, resulting in homocysteine toxicity, which has been found to increase your risk for cardiovascular disease, stroke, and tinnitus hearing disorder caused by peripheral neuropathy.

In many studies, scientists noted high correlations between high homocysteine levels and increased risk for hypertension, heart palpitations, heart attack, and stroke.

Similarly, elderly individuals with hearing loss and tinnitus are more likely to have elevated homocysteine than their peers with normal hearing.

Vitamin B12, Homocysteine, and your Heart

Vitamin B12 benefits

To date, the only known way to prevent symptoms of homocysteine toxicity is by controlling your vitamin B12 levels.

Vitamin B12 is an essential nutrient for your nervous system. Found in protein foods such as beef, chicken, and fish, vitamin B12 performs many important biochemical functions:

  • Vitamin B12 maintains red blood cell production, for adequate hemoglobin and oxygen.
  • Vitamin B12 sustains good metabolism, for increased energy.
  • Vitamin B12 enhances peripheral nerve cell communication, for healthy hearing, eyesight, cognitive balance, and muscle control.
  • Vitamin B12, along with folic acid and vitamin B6, helps your body digest homocysteine, keeping amino acids to a safe, normal level, and preventing symptoms that impair your hearing, heart health, and memory.

5 Surprising Foods that Pack Vitamin B12

How much vitamin B12?

Only supplementation of essential B vitamins, particularly vitamin B12 can effectively reduce excess homocysteine and put you back on the right track for hearing and heart health.

Recommended dosage is at least 1,000mg of vitamin B12, 400mcg of folic acid, and 100mg of vitamin B6 as needed.

Your turn!

Do you have any questions or suggestions?  Please leave your comments below.

Share with your friends!

If you found this article helpful, then please share with your friends, family, and coworkers by email, twitter, or Facebook.

Like this? Read more:

Vitamin B12- a Penny a Day Keeps Dementia Away

Warning: If you take Folate, you may have Vitamin B12 Deficiency

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/freedigitalphotos.net

40 Healthy Foods that Restore Energy- the Master List

Thursday, February 21st, 2013

 

 

Want to boost energy, prevent fatigue, and restore mental alertness? In addition to taking daily vitamins and minerals, and preventing vitamin B12 deficiency, it’s important to make sure you’re eating the right foods for maximum energy.

40 Healthy Foods that Restore Energy- the Master List- B12 Patch

For more energy throughout the day, you need to fill up on foods with high-octane, complex carbohydrates, lean proteins, and soluble fibers for normal digestion.

Look for energizing foods that provide antioxidants, minerals, and plenty of B vitamins for stamina, neurological integrity, and healthy metabolism.

Below is a list of the best healthy foods that provide the most energy.

  1. Apples- healthy fiber, fructose, vitamin C, antioxidants, and boron for alertness
  2. Bananas- B-vitamins, calcium, iron, magnesium, healthy fiber, and potassium
  3. Red bell peppers- vitamin C, healthy fiber, phytochemical lycopene, and vitamin B6.
  4. Carrots- healthy fiber, Beta-Carotene
  5. Celery- water, fiber, vitamin C, B-vitamins, potassium and sodium
  6. Tomatoes- vitamin C
  7. Sweet potatoes- vitamin A, vitamin C
  8. Pumpkin- potassium, fiber, vitamin A
  9. Spinach- iron, vitamin C, vitamin A, calcium, and folate
  10. Cantaloupe- B-vitamins, potassium, fructose, and water
  11. Watermelon- B-vitamins, potassium, fructose, and water
  12. Pineapple- Vitamin C and bromelain
  13. Mango- Vitamin C
  14. Sea vegetables- calcium, iron, magnesium, and potassium
  15. Dried figs- iron, potassium
  16. Raisins- iron, potassium
  17. Strawberries- vitamin C, soluble fiber, antioxidants
  18. Blueberries- antioxidants
  19. Sauerkraut- probiotic balance
  20. Tossed leafy green salad- iron, vitamin C, vitamin A, calcium, and folate
  21. Kidney beans- soluble fiber, vitamin B, iron, magnesium, potassium, zinc and calcium
  22. Hummus- protein, soluble fiber, iron, vitamin C, vitamin B, magnesium, potassium, zinc, calcium and folate.
  23. Soy- soluble fiber, vitamin B, iron, magnesium, potassium, zinc and calcium
  24. Lean meats- vitamin B12, tyrosine
  25. Lentils- soluble fiber, vitamin B, iron, magnesium, potassium, zinc and calcium
  26. Crab- vitamin B12, lean protein
  27. Salmon- vitamin B12, low-fat protein, omega-3 fatty acids, and Coenzyme Q10
  28. Low-fat yogurt- protein, calcium, and vitamin D
  29. Omelet- healthy protein, vitamin B12, tyrosine, iron, and yolks contain choline for mental energy
  30. Iron-fortified cereals- iron, healthy fiber, B-vitamins, and magnesium
  31. Brown rice- healthy filling fiber, manganese , magnesium, B vitamins
  32. Quinoa- soluble fiber, complete protein, vitamin B, iron, magnesium, potassium, zinc and calcium
  33. Oatmeal- B vitamins, soluble fiber, and boosts energy
  34. Dark chocolate- flavanols, iron and magnesium
  35. Pumpkin seeds- protein, tyrosine, iron, vitamin K, magnesium, calcium, and Coenzyme Q10
  36. Nuts- selenium, B- vitamins, copper, vitamin E, omega-3 fatty acids, tyrosine, magnesium,  manganese, iron, and Coenzyme Q10
  37. Lemon-mint water- vitamin C, prevents dehydration and fatigue
  38. Coconut water- electrolytes to prevent dehydration and fatigue
  39. Green smoothie- combined energy-boosting nutrients of yogurt, leafy green vegetables, apples, and bananas
  40. Tea- caffeine, L-theanine

Your turn!

What foods do you think provide the most energy?

What nutritional supplements do you take for stamina, memory, and mental focus?

Do you have any questions or suggestions?  Please leave your comments below.

Share with your friends!

If you found this article helpful, then please share with your friends, family, and coworkers by email, Facebook, or Google+.

Like this? Read more:

Will Vitamin B12 Boost Energy if I don’t have B12 Deficiency? YES!

Stop Vitamin B12 Deficiency Fatigue-Top 4 Energy-Boosting Foods

Fight Chronic Fatigue with Vitamin B-12, plus 10 Energy Tips!

Sources:

25 Snacks That Will Give You Energy Throughout The Day

Foods to Fight Fatigue

Food For Energy: 16 Foods That Will Wake You Up

Image(s) courtesy of Grant Cochrane/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Vitamin Deficiency symptoms List

Sunday, May 20th, 2012

What are the symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency…or any other vitamin deficiency, for that matter?  Fatigue, brain fog, muscular pain, and frequent numbness in the hands and feet could signal vitamin B12 deficiency, but what about all the other vitamins?  Here is a complete list of vitamins and minerals, plus symptoms that correlate with vitamin deficiencies.

VITAMIN DEFICIENCY SYMPTOMS LIST, B12 Patch

Vitamin A (Retinol)

Food sources: Yams, beef liver, spinach, carrots, and pumpkin.

Vitamin deficiency symptoms: Color-blindness, conjunctivitis, dry eyes, Bitot’s spots, farsightedness, corneal ulcers, ichthyosis (scaly skin), macular degeneration, photophobia, night blindness, keratosis, dry hair, ridged nails, peeling nails, acne, skin infections, jaundice, shingles, and wrinkles.

Vitamin B1 (Thiamine)

Food sources: Mushrooms, sunflower seeds, tuna, and broccoli.

Vitamin deficiency symptoms: Chronic fatigue, loss of appetite, nerve damage, heart palpitations, mental confusion, depression, dementia, forgetfulness, nervous irritability, Beriberi disease, crossed eyes, dim vision, glaucoma, Raynaud’s disease, sensitivity to insect bites, furrowed tongue, Addison’s disease, fungal infections, itching, white patches on tongue.

Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin)

Food sources: Liver, mushrooms, spinach, and dark green vegetables.

Vitamin deficiency symptoms: Loss of appetite, nerve damage, depression, nervous irritability, increased homocysteine levels (heart attack and stroke risk), blurred vision, cataracts, conjunctivitis, dim vision, glaucoma, retinitis, corneal ulcers, macular degeneration, night blindness, photophobia, eyelid tics, acne, Addison’s disease, eczema, fungal infections, seborrhea, itching, white-heads, rosacea, eczema around nose and ears, dandruff, oily hair, sore tongue, cracked lips at corners of the mouth, purplish or magenta tongue, white patches on tongue.

9 Vitamin Deficiencies and the People who are affected by them

Vitamin B3 (Niacin)

Food sources: Brown rice, tuna, mushrooms, liver, beans, and lean meat.

Vitamin deficiency symptoms: Loss of appetite, fatigue, mental confusion, depression, dementia, nervous irritability, diarrhea, acne, Addison’s disease, fungal infections, itching, reddish-brown skin on neck, white patches on tongue.

Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxal phosphate)

Food sources: Bananas, bell peppers, potato skins, garbanzo beans, prune juice, and dark green leafy vegetables.

Vitamin deficiency symptoms: Chronic fatigue, depression, nervous irritability, increased homocysteine levels (heart attack and stroke risk), numbness in the hands and feet, blurred vision, conjunctivitis, dark spots in front of the eyes, retinitis, corneal ulcers, macular degeneration, night blindness, eyelid tics, acne, Addison’s disease, eczema, edema, fungal infections, dermatitis around eyes and nose, skin infections, itching, jaundice, pale skin, vitiligo, dandruff, hair loss, white spots on nails, sore tongue, cracked lips at corners of the mouth, bad breath, canker sores, white patches on tongue.

VITAMIN DEFICIENCY SYMPTOMS LIST, B12 Patch

Vitamin B9 (Folic acid)

Food sources: Organ meat, beans, dark green leafy vegetables, beets, and cauliflower.

Vitamin deficiency symptoms: Mental confusion, depression, dementia, forgetfulness, nervous irritability, insomnia, aggression, cervical dysplasia, megaloblastic anemia, increased homocysteine levels (heart attack and stroke risk), nerve damage, failure to thrive, low birth weight, neural tube defects, breathlessness, heart palpitations, pale skin, reddish-brown skin on neck, graying hair, hangnails, cracked lips at corners of the mouth, canker sores, beefy, red tongue, gingivitis.

Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin)

Food sources: Organ meats, cod, halibut, salmon, shellfish, lean meat, eggs, and dairy products.

Vitamin deficiency symptoms: Chronic fatigue, loss of appetite, nerve damage, painful tingling and numbness in the hands and feet, loss of balance, movement problems, heart palpitations, breathlessness, mental confusion, hallucinations, depression, memory loss, dementia, forgetfulness, nervous irritability, increased homocysteine levels (heart attack and stroke risk), diarrhea, dim vision, retinitis, eyelid tics, miscarriages, fertility problems, Addison’s disease, brown pigmentation around small joints, fungal infections, itching, jaundice, pale skin, shingles, vitiligo, hair loss, sore tongue, beefy, red tongue, canker sores, white patches on tongue, altered sense of taste.

VITAMIN DEFICIENCY SYMPTOMS LIST, B12 Patch

Vitamin B12 Deficiency-13 Illnesses that Block B12 Absorption

Vitamin C (Ascorbic acid)

Food sources: Guava, papayas, strawberries, citrus fruits, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, bell peppers, and dark green leafy vegetables.

Vitamin deficiency symptoms: Chronic fatigue, loss of appetite, cataracts, conjunctivitis, crossed eyes, dark spots in front of the eyes, dim vision, glaucoma, retinitis, corneal ulcers, near-sightedness, acne, Addison’s disease, eczema, edema, skin infections, itching, jaundice, prickly-heat rash, shingles, wrinkles, hangnails, peeling nails, gingivitis.

VITAMIN DEFICIENCY SYMPTOMS LIST, B12 Patch

Vitamin D

Food sources: Salmon, sardines, shrimp, fish oil, yams, and dairy products fortified with vitamin D.

Vitamin deficiency symptoms: Nervous irritability, near-sightedness, increased risk for diabetes, rickets, skeletal deformities, muscular weakness, soft bones, muscular pain (especially lower back pain), frequent bone fractures, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, hypertension, hypocalcemia, muscle twitches, numbness in the hands and feet, irregular heartbeat.

Vitamin E

Food sources: Vegetable oils, wheat germ oil, dark green leafy vegetables, avocadoes, seeds, nuts, and whole grains.

Vitamin deficiency symptoms: Loss of appetite, nausea, anemia, immune system disorders, angina, muscular pain, tingling and numbness in the hands and feet, movement problems, miscarriages, fertility problems, bulging eyes, cataracts, crossed eyes, near-sightedness, acne, jaundice, shingles, wrinkles.

Calcium

VITAMIN DEFICIENCY SYMPTOMS LIST, B12 PatchFood sources: Yogurt, cheese, sardines, canned salmon, milk, and dark green leafy vegetables.

Vitamin deficiency symptoms: Osteoporosis, hypocalcemia, tingling and numbness in the hands and feet, muscular pain, irregular heartbeat, fatigue, loss of appetite, frequent bone fractures, peeling nails, ridged nails, gingivitis.

Magnesium

Food sources: Wheat bran, almonds, cashews, dark green leafy vegetables, tofu, beans, and seeds.

Vitamin deficiency symptoms: Loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, fatigue, weakness, tingling and numbness in the hands and feet, muscular pain, mood swings, irregular heartbeat, hypocalcemia, farsightedness, glaucoma, retinitis, macular degeneration, eyelid tics, Addison’s disease, edema, skin infections, jaundice, dandruff, bad breath.

Zinc

Food sources: Oysters, crab, lobsters, beef, poultry, and fortified cereals.

Vitamin deficiency symptoms: Diarrhea, immune system disorders, failure to thrive, poor concentration, dark spots in front of the eyes, retinitis, corneal ulcers, macular degeneration, night blindness, eyelid tics, acne, eczema, edema, dermatitis around eyes and nose, skin infections, jaundice, vitiligo, dandruff, dry and brittle hair, hair loss, white spots on nails, bad breath, canker sores.

Please tell us…

Did this article help you?

Do you have any questions or suggestions?  Please leave your comments below.

Share with your friends!

If you found this article helpful, then please share with your friends, family, and coworkers by email, Facebook, or Google+.

Read more about vitamin B12 deficiency

Is Vitamin B12 Deficiency an Autoimmune Disorder? Yup.

Top Ten Signs of a Vitamin B12 Deficiency


References:

Vitamin Chart :: Vitamin Deficiency Symptoms, Benefits, Food Sources

Deficiency Symptoms

Dietary Supplement Fact Sheets

Images:

Piyachok Thawornmatpiyato, AmbroGrant Cochrane

If you have Vitamin B Deficiency, ya’ might be a Redneck…

Tuesday, May 15th, 2012

 

 

What happens if you don’t get enough vitamin B12, folate, or niacin? You could end up with severe vitamin B deficiency, causing symptoms ranging from uncomfortable to potentially dangerous.

IF YOU HAVE VITAMIN B DEFICIENCY, YA’ MIGHT BE A REDNECK, B12 Patch

B careful out there

B-complex refers to eight essential nutrients that work together to boost energy, regulate production of red blood cells, and sustain neurological health. Most B vitamins such as vitamin B12 are only obtainable from protein foods such as beef, chicken, fish, eggs, or milk, but some also occur in leafy greens and beans.

If you don’t get enough of any vitamin into your system, then you will eventually develop a vitamin deficiency, which in turn causes illnesses like vitamin B12 pernicious anemia or rickets.

Got your B vitamins right here

B-complex vitamins include:

  • Vitamin B1 (thiamine)
  • Vitamin B2 (riboflavin)
  • Vitamin B3 (niacin)
  • Vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid)
  • Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine)
  • Vitamin B7 (biotin)
  • Vitamin B12 (cobalamin)
  • Folic acid

Back in my day, we didn’t have corndogs

Corn contains plenty of niacin, but it’s not easy to obtain- you have to know how to process corn kernels in such a way as to release this essential B vitamin and make it digestible.  The Indians knew how to obtain niacin from corn, but the earliest American settlers didn’t, choosing instead to mill dried corn and consume it as flour. As a result, many developed niacin deficiency- pellagra.

IF YOU HAVE VITAMIN B DEFICIENCY, YA’ MIGHT BE A REDNECK, B12 Patch

The basic symptoms of vitamin B3 deficiency are:

  • Dermatitis- skin that burn easily, and gets dark, thick and sweaty (hence the term “redneck.”)
  • Diarrhea
  • Dementia- paranoia and “brain fog
  • Untreated, niacin deficiency can be fatal

Fast-forward a few centuries

Today, we still prefer to eat corn in its meal form.  American favorites like cornbread, tortilla chips, and corndogs all begin with cornmeal. However, we manage to avoid most vitamin deficiencies by eating a wide variety of food groups and taking vitamin supplements.

IF YOU HAVE VITAMIN B DEFICIENCY, YA’ MIGHT BE A REDNECK, B12 Patch

Still, certain vitamin deficiencies can sneak up on you.

Vitamin B12 deficiency, for example, can occur even if you eat a steady diet of beef burgers, chicken wings, and stuffed trout.

People (possibly) unknowingly at risk for vitamin B12 deficiency include:

  • Anybody missing the digestive enzyme intrinsic factor
  • Anybody taking metformin for diabetes, or PPIs for GERD
  • Anybody who has had a gastric bypass
  • Anybody who suffers from chronic digestive problems
  • Anybody who suffers from autoimmune disorders like fibromyalgia or celiac disease
  • Anybody who indulges in excessive alcoholic beverages
  • Anybody over the age of 65

To find out if you have B12 deficiency, or any vitamin deficiency, ask your doctor for a blood test.

Supplementation for vitamin B12 deficiency includes routine vitamin B12 shots, vitamin B12 supplements, b12 sublingual pills.

Please tell us…

Have you experienced any symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency, such as tiredness, numbness, painful tingling, or brain fog? If so, have you tested for B12 deficiency?

Do you have any questions or suggestions?  Please leave your comments below.

Share with your friends!

If you found this article helpful, then please share with your friends, family, and coworkers by email, Facebook, or Google+.

Read more about B12 deficiency

Is Vitamin B12 Deficiency an Autoimmune Disorder? Yup.

Top Ten Signs of a Vitamin B12 Deficiency

9 Vitamin Deficiencies and the People who are affected by them

References:

Deficiency Diseases of the Nervous System

A brief history of nutritional deficiencies and chronic disease

Pellagra- Medline Plus Medical Encyclopedia

Images:

drewgstephens, mynameisharsha, Base Camp Baker

Chronically Pained? Here’s your Essential Chronic Pain Checklist…

Monday, May 14th, 2012

 

 

Managing chronic pain can feel like an uphill battle- if you suffer from chronic headaches, fibromyalgia, arthritis, or all of the above, then you’re probably doing all you can to prevent flare-ups, fight constant fatigue, and relieve achy joints, stomach cramps, and sore muscles.  Just so that you don’t forget, check out this handy list of important coping mechanisms for chronic pain management- how many of these do you use in your day?

Chronically Pained? Here’s your Essential Chronic Pain Checklist…

#1: Get high on exercise!

While it is possible to overdo it with physical exertion, especially with fibromyalgia, there’s one thing you can’t get too much of, and that’s endorphins- nature’s own painkillers.  You don’t have to lift 2-ton barbells or run a mad dash to the finish line to benefit, either.  Just 20-30 minutes of walking, swimming, or low-impact aerobics is enough to get some of those brain-made feel-good chemicals.

Chronically Pained? Here’s your Essential Chronic Pain Checklist…

10 Fibromyalgia-Friendly Exercises that Boost Energy- You can do it!

#2: Breathe in, breathe out!

What do yoga, tai chi, progressive relaxation, anger management, and biofeedback all have in common? They all focus on your breathing!  Your lungs are more than just necessary organs to keep you alive; with practice, you can learn how to use cleansing, controlled breaths (also called pranayama) to relax your whole body, relieve pain, and boost energy.

Why More Fibromyalgia Patients are Taking Tai Chi

#3: Quit smoking and alcohol!

Chronically Pained? Here’s your Essential Chronic Pain Checklist…The last thing you need if you suffer from chronic pain is more health problems. This might seem like a no-brainer, but weaning yourself off addictive chemicals isn’t easy, and requires a lot of motivation. So here goes: alcohol and cigarettes lead to increased pain symptoms, fatigue, and numerous diseases, including lung disease, and heart disease.

#4: Eat your pain away!

Eating healthy isn’t just about maintaining your weight or staving off hunger- by choosing foods that your body needs, you are also helping to prevent chronic pain symptoms like stomachaches, headaches, and diabetic pain, in addition to preventing heart disease, obesity, and gastrointestinal problems.  Eat low-fat, whole ingredients like grains, fresh vegetables, and lean meats, versus processed snacks or fast food that contain zero nutrients.

#5: Log your pain!

Every day, keep track of your pain symptoms in a “pain journal” that you can share with your doctor- it may help you find important clues to possible pain triggers. Take note of things you ate, activities, pain medications, and your pain scale.

15 Chronic Pain Myths- Debunked!

#6: Keep your mind occupied!

One of the worst things you can do if you suffer from chronic pain is…suffer constantly.  Studies prove that people who dwell on their pain symptoms and make it the focus of their life are least likely to find relief. Find some activity that you enjoy- one that fits in with your daily schedule and doesn’t wear you out- and do it! It can be a crossword puzzle, a hobby, or chatting with a friend…any activity that distracts you from your chronic pain will help improve your quality of life and general sense of wellbeing.

10 Celebrities with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

#7: Educate yourself about your pain meds!

A staggering number of prescription pain medications can be harmful or fatal.  Unfortunately, many doctors are negligent in informing their patients beforehand about the possible side effects of using opioid painkillers or even NSAIDs for long-term pain management.  Be up front- ask your doctor about all your current prescriptions, and find out about any alternative medications that produce the same pain relief without causing side effects.

15 Chronic Pain Causes and 15 Treatments (Vitamin B12 is one)

#8: Avoid vitamin deficiency!

Surprisingly, vitamin deficiency correlates strongly with many of today’s chronic pain illnesses.

  • Vitamin B12 deficiency has been linked with numerous pain symptoms and disorders, including fibromyalgia, Crohn’s disease, chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), diabetic neuropathy, pernicious anemia neuropathy, migraine, and celiac disease.  For proper diagnosis, ask your doctor for a blood screening for vitamin B12 deficiency.
  • Other B vitamins besides vitamin B12- such as vitamin B2, vitamin B6, and folic acid are beneficial for the muscles and joints.
  • A large number of migraine patients are deficient in magnesium.
  • Coenzyme Q10, a chemical produced by your body, is also beneficial for maintaining a healthy response to inflammation.

Chronically Pained? Here’s your Essential Chronic Pain Checklist…

Please tell us…

Do you have any chronic pain management tips to add?

Do you use vitamin B12 supplements daily?

Do you have any questions or suggestions?  Please leave your comments below.

Share with your friends!

If you found this article helpful, then please share with your friends, family, and coworkers by email, Facebook, or Google+.

Read more about chronic pain

8 Ailments Linked with Gastritis, including B12 Deficiency

Chronic Pain and Acute Pain- What’s the Difference, anyways?

B Vitamins prevent Cardiovascular Disease- B6, B12 and Folate

Images:

Stuart Miles, federico stevanin, africa, scottchan

13 Essential Vitamins and Minerals for Crohn’s Disease

Tuesday, April 17th, 2012

 

 

Crohn’s disease is a chronic bowel disorder that causes damage to the intestinal tract, leading to vitamin deficiencies, severe stomach pains, diarrhea, and fever.  Doctors recommend following a restrictive diet for treating Crohn’s disease, in addition to adopting a strict vitamin regimen.  Here are the top 13 vitamins and minerals recommended for Crohn’s disease patients.

13 Essential Vitamins and Minerals for Crohn’s Disease, B12 Patch

Vitamin B12

In order to digest vitamin B12 (cobalamin) from food sources, your body has to be able to make intrinsic factor, an enzyme produced in the stomach that aids in vitamin B12 absorption.  Because Crohn’s disease destroys stomach tissue, it’s common for Crohn’s patients to acquire vitamin B12 deficiency, in addition to other nutritional deficiencies.

Symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency include everyday fatigue, sluggishness, memory loss, painful tingling and numbness in your extremities (feet, hands, tongue), anxiety, and dizziness.

To find out if you have vitamin B12 deficiency, ask your doctor for a blood test to measure vitamin B12 levels.

Treatment requires non-dietary vitamin B12 supplements, usually from a vitamin B12 shot or alternative method.

13 Essential Vitamins and Minerals for Crohn’s Disease, B12 Patch

Read Four Reasons to check your Vitamin B12 Levels with Crohn’s Disease

Folic acid

13 Essential Vitamins and Minerals for Crohn’s Disease, B12 PatchFolic acid is another essential B vitamin; it’s crucial for preventing birth defects in utero.  If you’re using the sulfa drug sulfasalazine for Crohn’s disease, then you are at high risk for developing folic acid deficiency.  Experts recommend taking 1 mg of folic acid per day.

Vitamin A

Because Crohn’s disease sufferers often have difficulty absorbing vitamin A from food, doctors highly recommend adding the A vitamin to your vitamin regimen.

Vitamin D

Experts have noted a high correlation of vitamin D deficiency among Crohn’s disease patients.  Vitamin D deficiency causes bone loss, muscular soreness, and weakness.  It’s also believed that vitamin D is essential for promoting immune system health.  Sun exposure increases vitamin D levels, but supplements are also available.

Vitamin E

Vitamin E deficiency is high among Crohn’s patients who have difficulty eating foods like dark leafy greens and nuts.  To avoid symptoms like muscular weakness, tingling, and numbness, experts recommend taking daily doses of vitamin E oil.

Vitamin K

Vitamin K occurs naturally in dark leafy veggies, and is essential for healthy blood clotting and bone strength.  If you have difficulty absorbing fat-soluble vitamins, then you should include vitamin K in your daily vitamin therapy.

Iron

Iron anemia is a risk factor with Crohn’s disease, due to intestinal bleeding.  Iron deficiency causes symptoms like extreme fatigue, paleness, and headaches.  A blood test can determine if you have iron deficiency.

13 Essential Vitamins and Minerals for Crohn’s Disease, B12 Patch

Calcium

Crohn’s disease increases your risk for calcium deficiency, especially if you are using corticosteroids as part of your immune system therapy.  Additionally, vitamin B12 deficiency, common among Crohn’s patients, increases your risk for bone loss.  Health experts recommend taking 1,000-1,200 mg of calcium supplements each day.

Magnesium

Crohn’s disease causes severe bouts of diarrhea, during which time high doses of magnesium are expelled rapidly.  To prevent magnesium deficiency, experts recommend supplementing with extra magnesium, especially during flare-ups.

On the Run with Crohn’s? 6 Ways to Ease Public Restroom Anxiety

Zinc

Zinc supplies are also depleted with chronic diarrhea, making this another essential nutrient to take regularly if you have Crohn’s disease.

Probiotics

13 Essential Vitamins and Minerals for Crohn’s Disease, B12 PatchProbiotics contain “good” bacteria that are helpful for boosting digestive health and preventing pouchitis, a common side effect resulting from pouch surgery.  For best results, ask your gastroenterologist to recommend a specific bacterial strain.

Gut Bugs:Winning the Bacteria Battle

Omega-3 fatty acids

Omega-3 fatty acids, such as the kind found in fish oil, are helpful for fighting inflammation, a common side effect of Crohn’s disease.

Glutamine

Glutamine is an amino acid that promotes intestinal health.  Many doctors advise taking 400 mg of glutamine, 4 times per day, for preventing Crohn’s disease symptoms.

Please tell us…

Do you have Crohn’s disease?  If so, do you agree with these dietary recommendations?  Do you use any vitamins that are not included in this list?  Have you tested for vitamin deficiency, including vitamin B12 anemia?

Do you have any questions or suggestions?  Please leave your comments below.

Share with your friends!

If you found this article helpful, then please share with your friends, family, and coworkers by email, Facebook, or Google+.

Read more about Crohn’s and vitamin B12:

Gastrointestinal Surgery for Crohn’s (IBD) and B12 Warnings

101 Helpful Sites for Kids ‘n Teens with Crohn’s (and their Parents)

Crohn’s- 9 Irritable Bowel Disease (IBD) Myths to Ignore

Sources:

Crohn’s disease

10 Vitamins You May Need if You Have Crohn’s

10 Herbs and Vitamins That Are Good for Your Gut

Images: Lori Greig, cohdra, bradley j


9 Vitamin Deficiencies and the People who are affected by them

Tuesday, February 7th, 2012

 

 

Rickets and scurvy aren’t the only types of vitamin deficiencies; many vitamin deficiencies such as vitamin B12 deficiency (eg: pernicious anemia) and vitamin D deficiency cause debilitating symptoms like nerve damage, depression, heart disease, and memory loss.  In some cases, you can develop a vitamin deficiency even while eating a healthy diet of lean meats, vegetables, and low-fat dairy foods.

9 VITAMIN DEFICIENCIES AND THE PEOPLE WHO ARE AFFECTED BY THEM, B12 PATCH

Vitamin A (Retinol) deficiency

Vitamin A is a fat-soluble nutrient that can be found in animal-based products and plant-based foods like Romaine lettuce, carrots, yams, cantaloupe, and peaches.  Vitamin A is crucial for supporting eye health, sustaining cellular and tissue health, and promoting normal prenatal development.

In today’s age, vitamin A deficiency is rare.  Unless you specifically avoid eating foods that contain vitamin A and beta-carotene, you will probably not get this vitamin deficiency.

Symptoms of vitamin A deficiency are:

  • Dry eyes
  • Skin rashes
  • Night blindness
  • Diarrhea

People at risk for vitamin A deficiency are:

  • Alcoholics
  • People who are not able to digest fat due to an illness; individuals with celiac disease, cystic fibrosis, or cholestasis should have their vitamin A levels checked routinely.

Vitamin B1 (Thiamine) deficiency

Thiamine is a B vitamin that is essential for good stamina, enhancing muscle tone, and sustaining a healthy nervous system.  Thiamine deficiency correlates with Beriberi disease, a rare illness that causes gastrointestinal disorders, peripheral neuropathy, heart disease, and muscular pain.

Symptoms of vitamin B1 deficiency are:

  • Fatigue
  • Depression
  • Stomach cramps
  • Difficulty digesting carbohydrates

People at risk for vitamin B1 deficiency are:

  • People from countries who eat polished white rice that has been stripped of nutritious rice bran as a staple food item
  • Pregnant or lactating mothers
  • People with chronic diarrhea
  • People with liver disease
  • Alcoholics

9 Conditions that Mimic Fibromyalgia and Vitamin B12 Deficiency

Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin) deficiency

Vitamin B2 deficiency is almost unheard of in of itself.  Usually, is somebody has vitamin B1 deficiency, they are also suffering from various other nutritional deficiencies at the same time, such as vitamin D deficiency and vitamin B12 deficiency.

Symptoms of vitamin B2 deficiency are:

  • Fatigue
  • Stomach problems
  • Painful cracks and sores at the corners of your mouth
  • Tired eyes
  • Swollen tongue
  • Sore throat
  • Hypersensitivity to light

People at risk for vitamin B2 deficiency are:

  • People from poorer populations or underdeveloped countries who do not have access to nutritionally dense foods
  • Alcoholics
  • People with chronic diarrhea, such as Crohn’s disease

9 VITAMIN DEFICIENCIES AND THE PEOPLE WHO ARE AFFECTED BY THEM, B12 PATCH

Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine) deficiency

Vitamin B6 is one of many essential B vitamins; vitamin B6 aids in cognitive development and maintaining the nervous system. Vitamins B6, B12, and B9 work together to maintain already healthy homocysteine levels for cardiovascular health.

Symptoms of vitamin B6 deficiency are

  • Muscular feebleness
  • Memory loss
  • Depression
  • Difficulty concentrating

Vitamin B6 is rare, but the following individuals are sometimes at risk:

  • The elderly
  • Pregnant women
  • Women taking oral birth control

Vitamin B9 (Folic acid) deficiency

Folic acid, or folate, is a B vitamin that is crucial for production of DNA and RNA during fetal development, infancy, and adolescence.  Folic acid also works together with vitamin B12 to produce red blood cells and assist in iron absorption.

Symptoms of vitamin B9 deficiency are:

  • Fatigue
  • Sore tongue
  • Gum disease
  • Shortness of breath
  • Diarrhea
  • Short-term memory loss
  • Reduced appetite

People at risk for vitamin B9 deficiency are:

  • Alcoholics
  • Pregnant women
  • People with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)
  • People with celiac disease

9 VITAMIN DEFICIENCIES AND THE PEOPLE WHO ARE AFFECTED BY THEM, B12 PATCH

Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin) deficiency

Vitamin B12 is a water-soluble B vitamin that occurs in animal-based foods like beef, chicken, fish, shellfish, eggs, cheese, and milk.  Vitamin B12 is essential for energy, healthy DNA, red blood cell production, cognitive functioning, and a health nervous system.  Vitamin B12 deficiency differs from other kinds of malnourishment in that it can occur even when nutritional guidelines for vitamin B12 consumption are being met.

Symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency are:

  • Fatigue
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Short-term memory loss
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Painful tingling in the hands and feet
  • Sore, red tongue
  • Frequent clumsiness and stumbling

People at risk for vitamin B12 deficiency are:

  • Individuals who eat a vegan diet
  • Diabetics taking metformin
  • GERD sufferers or pregnant women taking protein pump inhibitors (PPIs)
  • People with pernicious anemia who lack intrinsic factor
  • People who suffer from gastrointestinal symptoms, such as Crohn’s disease, colitis, migraines, fibromyalgia, gluten intolerance, or celiac disease
  • People who have had gastric bypass surgery
  • Any individuals who have had surgery involving the removal of the ileum
  • The elderly
  • Alcoholics

9 VITAMIN DEFICIENCIES AND THE PEOPLE WHO ARE AFFECTED BY THEM, B12 PATCH


Vitamin C (Ascorbic acid) deficiency

Vitamin C is a water-soluble vitamin found in tomatoes, citrus fruits, broccoli, and potatoes. Vitamin C is helpful in growing cell tissue to seal wounds, promoting a defense against free radicals, and for maintaining healthy bones and teeth.  Long ago, vitamin C deficiency caused scurvy, which caused swollen bleeding gums, fatigue, and lowered immune system.

Symptoms of vitamin C deficiency are:

  • Dry hair
  • Gingivitis
  • Dry, flaking skin
  • Slow healing from wounds and bruises
  • Nosebleeds
  • Proneness to infections

People who are at risk for vitamin C deficiency are:

  • Cigarette smokers

Vitamin D deficiency

Vitamin D is a fat-soluble nutrient that is stored in your body and produced with exposure to sunlight.  Vitamin D is essential for aiding calcium in bone production and boosting your immune system.  Rickets is caused by vitamin D deficiency in children.  Other illnesses linked with vitamin D deficiency are osteoporosis, obesity, hypertension, seasonal affective disorder (SAD), diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and heart disease.

Symptoms of long-term vitamin D deficiency are:

  • 9 VITAMIN DEFICIENCIES AND THE PEOPLE WHO ARE AFFECTED BY THEM, B12 PATCHDepression
  • Weak bones
  • Frequent stumbling
  • High blood pressure

People at risk for vitamin D deficiency are:

  • People who live in cold, rainy northern countries with little exposure to sunlight
  • People of dark skin color
  • Infants
  • People who cover their bodies completely with dark garments, even while outdoors
  • The elderly

Vitamin E deficiency

Vitamin E is a fatty antioxidant that occurs in many foods and oils. Vitamin E is essential for promoting cardiovascular health, cellular functioning, and red blood cell production.

Symptoms of vitamin E deficiency are:

  • Muscular feebleness
  • Irregular eye movements
  • Visual impairment
  • Frequent stumbling

People at risk for vitamin E deficiency are:

  • Individuals with cystic fibrosis, pancreatitis, and cholestasis who cannot digest fat molecules

Please tell us…

Have you been suffering from severe fatigue, memory loss, and general loss of energy?

Has this been building up for months, or years?

If so, you might have vitamin B12 deficiency.

Please share this article with your friends- spread the love!

Read more about vitamin B12 deficiency:

Balance your B12, Balance your Nerves

Vitamin B12 Deficiency and Movement Disorders- How They Relate

Lupus and Vitamin B12 Deficiency- What’s the Connection?

Sources:

Complementary and Alternative Medicine Index (CAM)

Images, from top:

gamene, LifeSupercharger, sushi♥ina, andi.vs.zf, Pink Sherbet Photography

Gastric Bypass Surgery Better than Banding…or it it?

Tuesday, January 24th, 2012

 

 

Gastric bypass surgery offers the morbidly obese a new lease on life, according to research. Recent studies confirm that people who undergo Roux-en-Y weight loss surgery lose the most weight and keep it off, more so than with gastric banding.  But while gastric surgery promises a high success rate, the risk for serious complications is significantly higher than with other kinds of bariatric surgery.

GASTRIC BYPASS SURGERY BETTER THAN BANDING, BUT MORE DANGEROUS, B12PATCH

What is gastric bypass surgery?

The Roux-en-Y gastric bypass changes the size of your stomach and reroutes food past certain parts of the digestive system.  People who undergo gastric bypass surgery achieve a feeling of fullness much quicker than before the surgery, and are thus able to eat less and lose a considerable amount of weight. However, because gastric bypass is a complicated procedure, many problems may arise during or after the surgery.

  • With the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, a small egg-sized stomach sack is created and attached to the middle part of the small intestine.
  • The rest of the stomach, as well as the upper section of the small intestine, are completely avoided, or “bypassed.”
  • A common side effect of gastric bypass is gastric bypass dumping in which food travels through the stomach and empties into the small intestine too quickly, causing symptoms like diarrhea, nausea, and stomach cramps.
  • Another common side effect is nutritional deficiency, including vitamin B12 deficiency and many other vitamin, calcium, iron, and magnesium deficiencies.
  • Patients of gastric bypass surgery must supplement with extra vitamins and minerals, with a special emphasis on vitamin B12 supplements, in order to avoid vitamin B12 deficiency symptoms like nerve cell damage and memory problems.

Vitamin B12 deficiency after Bariatric Surgery Weight Loss

What is gastric banding?

Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding surgery is the second-most popular form of bariatric surgery after the gastric bypass procedure.  Banding is a good alternative for gastric bypass surgery because it is less invasive.

  • In gastric banding, the surgeon places an adjustable silicon band around the upper part of your stomach, effectively cinching it to a smaller size.
  • After banding, your stomach can hold only about 1 ounce of food at one time.
  • The gastric band is adjusted through a saline solution that may be injected through a small device under the skin.
  • Most people who undergo gastric banding lose approximately 40% of their body weight.
  • Gastric banding surgery is completely reversible.
  • The mortality rate due to gastric banding surgery is 1/2000.
  • Since the small intestine remains intact, gastric banding surgery does not disrupt your digestive system, and there is no risk of vitamin deficiency, such as vitamin B12 deficiency.

GASTRIC BYPASS SURGERY BETTER THAN BANDING, BUT MORE DANGEROUS, B12PATCH

Gastric Bypass Stomach Surgery in Mexico- Would you?

Is gastric banding surgery safer than gastric bypass?

In a recent study comparing success rates between gastric bypass surgery and gastric banding, scientists had this to say:

  • About 17% of gastric bypass patients had complications like infections following surgery, compared to only 5% of gastric banding patients.
  • Six years post-surgery, 12% of gastric bypass patients were back to being morbidly obese, with a BMI over 35, while about a third of gastric banding patients were once again overweight.
  • Thirteen percent of bypass patients required a follow-up operation, while approximately 27% of gastric banding patients needed to return for more surgeries.
  • Complications involved with gastric banding include band erosion, stretched esophagus, or food-related issues.
  • Complications involved with gastric bypass can be much more severe; possibly fatal complications include bowel blockage and leakage of waste material into the body.

GASTRIC BYPASS SURGERY BETTER THAN BANDING, BUT MORE DANGEROUS, B12PATCH

Anorexic British Teen Regrets Gastric Bypass Surgery

Which should I choose- banding or bypass?

With gastric bypass surgery, food rushes through the digestive system, and essential minerals and vitamins pass through without ever being absorbed into the bloodstream.  So while you feed your stomach, you are not feeding the rest of the body the nutrients that it needs to survive.  Life-long supplementation of vitamins- vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E, and B vitamins-, and minerals is a commitment that gastric bypass patients much make.

Your chances of losing weight following gastric banding are 50/50, and there is a fair chance that you will have complications that require a return trip to the operating room.  However, banding-related complications are less severe than bypass-related complications, which can be fatal.  Then again, if obesity poses a serious life risk, then you might be better off with the most successful weight loss surgery- gastric bypass.

Was this article helpful?  If so, please share with your friends…and leave us your comments.  We’d love to hear from you!

Read more about bariatric surgery here:

10 Mistakes Gastric Bypass Patients Often Make

B12 Deficiency: Don’t Ignore the Symptoms

Weight Loss Surgery: What 50 Post-Op Patients have to Say

Sources:

Long term, gastric bypass beats out banding: study- Reuters

Gastric Banding Surgery for Weight Loss

Roux-En-Y Gastric Bypass

Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass vs Gastric Banding for Morbid Obesity

Images, from top:

außerirdische sind gesund, riverofgod, {eclaire}

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