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Posts Tagged ‘b12 injections’

Pernicious Anemia- What’s your Risk?

Tuesday, September 10th, 2013



The risk for pernicious anemia from vitamin B12 deficiency is highest among the elderly, but a significant number of people begin to notice the first symptoms in their 30s, contrary to popular belief. Listed below are some common symptoms of pernicious anemia and explanations regarding your risk for developing pernicious anemia in middle age.

Pernicious Anemia- What’s your Risk?

What is pernicious anemia?

Pernicious anemia is the final stage of vitamin B12 deficiency. Pernicious anemia used to be fatal until scientists figured out that death could be easily prevented by feeding patients high concentrations of Vitamin B12.

Vitamin B12 deficiency causes many debilitating health problems, including chronic fatigue, lethargy, weakness, memory loss and neurological and psychiatric problems – long before pernicious anemia sets in.  These symptoms can be quite misleading, leading to incorrect diagnoses.

What is Pernicious Anemia?

Stages of vitamin B12 deficiency

There are four stages to a Vitamin B12 deficiency that end in pernicious anemia:

  • Stage 1: Slowly declining blood levels of vitamin B12
  • Stage 2: Low cellular concentrations of vitamin B12
  • Stage 3: Increased homocysteine levels in the blood, and a decreased rate of DNA synthesis
  • Stage 4: Pernicious anemia

Illnesses that mimic pernicious anemia

Illnesses and other health conditions sometimes confused with vitamin B12 deficiency include:

  • Alzheimer’s dementia, cognitive decline and memory loss, collectively referred to as “aging”
  • Multiple sclerosis (MS) and other neurological disorders
  • Mental illness (depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, psychosis)
  • Learning or developmental disorders in children
  • Autism spectrum disorder
  • Autoimmune disease and immune dysregulation (unregulated immune response)
  • Male and female infertility

These diseases produce signs and symptoms that also occur with vitamin B12 deficiency – but are rarely diagnosed as such!

Pernicious anemia risk categories

The following groups are at greatest risk for vitamin B12 deficiency-pernicious anemia:

  • Anybody with a family history for autoimmune disorders or pernicious anemia
  • Vegetarians and vegans
  • People aged 60 or over
  • GERD patients using PPIs or acid suppressing drugs
  • Diabetics using drugs like metformin
  • Patients of Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, celiac or IBS
  • Women with a history of infertility and miscarriage

Vegetarians and Vegans take note: Vitamin B12 is found ONLY in animal products! To prevent pernicious anemia, it is absolutely essential that you supplement with high doses of vitamin B12.

Treating pernicious anemia

If you think you might have a vitamin B12 deficiency or pernicious anemia, you should pursue blood testing immediately. If you are vitamin B12 deficient, then the next step would be to identify the source of the deficiency.

Once the source of vitamin B12 deficiency is identified, you can then begin vitamin B12 supplementation. The many, long-term or permanent vitamin B12 supplementation is required in order to prevent a relapse of symptoms.

Your turn!

Do you have any questions or suggestions?  Please leave your comments below.

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Like this? Read more:

Vitamin B12 Deficiency and Insomnia

Vitamin B12 Deficiency is Type of Anemia: True or False?

Image courtesy of Ambro/freedigitalphotos

Tired of being Tired all the Time…It’s Tiring!

Thursday, December 1st, 2011



If you feel tired all the time, then join the club- the vitamin B12 deficiency club, which is becoming the top cause of chronic fatigue allover.  Vitamin B12 is crucial for brain health, and if you don’t get enough, you run the risk of suffering the red blood cell disease pernicious anemia- one of many vitamin B12 deficiency symptoms.


Why am I so tired all the time?

Fatigue causes you to feel sluggish, slow, confused, and constantly in a “brain fog.” You’re exhausted before you even step out of bed, and all day at work.  On the drive home, you catch yourself several times nodding off at the wheel.  By the time you’re ready to pack it up and call it a day, you’re almost too tired to change into your pajamas, sorely tempted to climb into bed, clothes, shoes, and all.


Why are you so tired all the time? Many conditions can cause chronic fatigue, and most of them begin with vitamin B12 deficiency.

What is vitamin B12?

Vitamin B12 is of the vitamin B complex vitamins, and occurs in foods like beef, poultry, fish, eggs, and milk.  Some of the best sources of vitamin B12 are organ meat, lean turkey, crabmeat, halibut, and yogurt.  Normally, sufficient amounts of B12 are stored in your liver, unless you are prone to vitamin B12 deficiency.

What is vitamin B12, and why is it so important?

What are the symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency?

Tiredness is at the core of the most common symptoms of B12 deficiency:  depression, chronic fatigue, anxiety, short-term memory loss, disorientation, trouble concentrating or remembering words, painful numbness or tingling in hands and feet, loss of balance while walking, muscular feebleness, and insomnia.

Here are some illnesses and chronic conditions linked to vitamin B12 deficiency:

  • Pernicious anemia

Sometimes, pernicious anemia is the cause of vitamin B12 deficiency.

Vitamin B12 helps your body produce healthy red blood cells needed to carry oxygen. With pernicious anemia, you have a shortage of vitamin B12, which leads to a shortage of red blood cells, which in turn causes a severe reduction in oxygen throughout your body, including the brain.

The resulting effect is overwhelming tiredness, lightheadedness, and an inability to concentrate.

What are the Symptoms of Pernicious Anemia- B12 deficiency?

  • Fibromyalgia

Scientists found that a high correlation exists between vitamin B12 deficiency and sufferers of fibromyalgia, an autoimmune disease that causes symptoms such as severe pain, skin sensitivity, sleep problems, and chronic fatigue.


Boost Energy and Beat Fatigue All Day Long- 8 Sure-Fire Tips

  • Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)

People with gastrointestinal disorders such as IBD- Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis- have extreme difficulty absorbing vitamin B12.  Symptoms such as sluggishness, diarrhea, and unexplainable exhaustion might be confused with IBD symptoms; in fact, vitamin B12 deficiency is a likely culprit that often is overlooked.

Celiac and B12- Celiac Disease and Vitamin B12 Deficiency

  • Depression

Vitamin B12 supports cognitive functioning- low B12 levels are common among people suffering from severe psychological disorders, including schizophrenia, clinical depression, and obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD).  Tiredness is one of many complaints of people suffering from depression and anxiety.

Can Elevated Homocysteine (Low B12) cause Mental Illness?

  • Heart disease

Vitamin B12 helps your body regulate the amount of homocysteine in your blood.  High levels of plasma homocysteine are strongly associated with heart disease and stroke. By breaking down homocysteine, and thus reducing the risk for heart disease or stroke, vitamin B12 promotes cardiovascular health.

Treatment for B12 deficiency

A blood test is necessary in order to diagnose vitamin B12 deficiency.  Not all doctors screen for low B12, so you will need to request a plasma vitamin B12 test.  If necessary, your doctor will prescribe B12 injections or sublingual B12.

Read more about vitamin B12 deficiency symptoms:

Is Vitamin B12 the Secret to the Fountain of Youth?

Why do my Arms and Legs often Fall Asleep? B12 and Paresthesia

Vitamin B12 Deficiency. Are you at Risk?


Sluggish? Confused? Vitamin B12 May Be Low

How to Stop Feeling Tired All The Time

Image credits, from top:

Disney Wiki, striatic, Tambako the Jaguar

Here’s Your Brain on B12 Deficiency- Memory Loss and Aging

Wednesday, November 16th, 2011



The elderly need to increase their intake of vitamin B12, in order to avoid memory loss from vitamin B12 deficiency.  Brain loss caused by Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia is sometimes a part of the aging process, but by getting enough vitamin B12 in your blood, you can prevent suffering the symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency.


Chicago study links low levels of vitamin B12 with memory loss

A 2011 study that focused on 121 community-dwelling participants of the Chicago Health and Aging Project found a strong correlation between vitamin B12 deficiency and memory loss.  Scientists measured methylmalonate levels to determine vitamin B12 deficiency.

  • They found a direct relationship between low levels of vitamin B12, reduced brain volume, and decreased cognitive skills, such as loss of short-term memory.
  • Scientists noted poorer memory skills, slower thinking processes, and impaired comprehension skills as attributes associated with elevated methylmalonate levels- an indicator of vitamin B12 deficiency.
  • Also considered were plasma homocysteine levels, which scientists also connected with loss of brain mass.  High levels of homocysteine are common in vitamin B12 deficiency.
  • Scientists concluded that methylmalonate, an indicator of vitamin B12 deficiency, has a direct impact on brain volume, and that vitamin B12 has multiple benefits on brain chemistry beyond just memory skills.
  • In 2008, a UK study conducted by the University of Oxford produced similar results; namely, that vitamin B12 deficiency is a likely cause of brain atrophy, dementia, and short-term memory loss among the elderly.


How to keep Vitamin B12 Deficiency from Shrinking your Brain

For the elderly, eating foods with vitamin B12 isn’t enough

HERE’S YOUR BRAIN ON B12 DEFICIENCY- MEMORY LOSS AND AGING, WWW.B12PATCH.COMEating plenty of foods rich in vitamin B12 is always a good idea; such foods include protein sources like beef, chicken, fish, eggs, milk, and cheese. But for the elderly, the problem isn’t really eating enough sources of vitamin B12, but rather digesting them.  Part of the aging process involves making less stomach acids that are necessary for absorbing vitamin B12 from foods.  As a result, many elderly individuals who include meat in their diet still run a high risk for getting B12 deficiency.

Unless blood tests indicate healthy levels of vitamin B12, senior citizens must supplement with vitamin B-12 (cobalamin) with a routine prescribed B12 shot in order to avoid the symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency.

Memory loss in B12 deficiency for the young and old

It isn’t just the elderly who should be concerned with memory loss- short-term memory loss is one of many symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency, regardless of age.


Vitamin B12- How much do you need?

Other symptoms of dangerously low B12 levels are:

  • Chronic fatigue
  • Depression
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Anxiety
  • Paranoia
  • Aggressive behavior
  • Hallucinations
  • Balance problems
  • Poor muscular control
  • Numbness or tingling in hands, arms, feet, and legs
  • Sore, red swollen tongue
  • Altered taste perception

Long-term exposure to vitamin B12 deficiency could result in severe neurological damage, pernicious anemia, increased risk for heart attack, stroke, and osteoporosis.

Read more about vitamin B12 deficiency and memory loss:

12 Ways to Avoid Alzheimer’s Disease

FDA Approves Brain Scan to Detect Alzheimer’s Disease

Adult ADHD Could Lead to Dementia


Low Vitamin B12 Linked to Smaller Brains and Cognitive Decline

Vitamin B12 Levels Linked to Memory Skills and Brain Size

Low Vitamin B12 May Speed Brain Shrinkage

Low Vitamin B12 Linked to Smaller Brain Size

Elevated Plasma Homocysteine Is Associated with Increased Brain Atrophy Rates in Older Subjects with Mild Hypertension

Vitamin B12, cognition, and brain MRI measures- A cross-sectional examination

Vitamin B12 status and rate of brain volume loss in community-dwelling elderly

Image credits, from top:

Was a bee, Sean.lewis29, Ambro, photostock

Low B12 means Low Thyroid- Hypothyroidism and B12 Deficiency

Tuesday, November 8th, 2011



Being tired all the time is a symptom of B12 deficiency, but it can also signal hypothyroidism (low thyroid), a thyroid disease that occurs with low B12 levels.  Because hypothyroid symptoms are similar, vitamin B12 deficiency often goes undetected.


B12 deficiency causes fatigue, depression, and other mood disorders often associated with an underactive thyroid. If you’ve been diagnosed with thyroiditis, then it’s also important also to recognize the symptoms of B12 deficiency, and know whether you might require more vitamin B12 (cobalamin).

What is hypothyroidism?

Hypothyroidism is an autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) that occurs in the thyroid gland, causing inflammation, and reducing its ability to produce sufficient amounts of thyroid hormones.
Hashimoto’s disease is one example of thyroiditis that causes low thyroid levels.  

Sometimes, thyroid treatment for hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid), such as radioactive iodine or surgery, can backfire, causing underactive thyroid symptoms.

Why am I always tired?  Symptoms of hypothyroidism

Symptoms of low thyroid include:

  • Empty facial expressions
  • Husky, gravelly voice
  • Chronic fatigue, tiredness
  • Sluggish, droning speech patterns
  • “Brain fog,” or confusion
  • Depression
  • Uncontrolled weight gain
  • Droopy eyelids
  • Puffy, bloated face
  • Constipation
  • Diarrhea
  • Dry skin and hair
  • Sparse hair, including eyebrows
  • Tingling and numbness in the hands and feet
  • Muscular pain
  • Feebleness
  • Slow resting heart rate
  • Orange-colored skin on the hands and feet
  • Heavy menstrual periods in women


Vitamin B12 for Healthy Hair, Skin and Nails

Vitamin B12 deficiency symptoms

Vitamin B12 is a water-soluble nutrient that is responsible for making red blood cells, controlling DNA synthesis, regulating the nervous system, and improving cognitive functioning.  Without proper levels of vitamin B12, you may suffer neurological damage, dementia, or heart attack resulting from elevated homocysteine levels.

Low B12 symptoms include:

  • Depression
  • Chronic fatigue, tiredness
  • Anxiety
  • Short-term memory loss
  • “Brain fog,” or confusion
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Neurosis
  • Altered taste perception
  • Swollen, red tongue
  • Tingling and numbness in the hands and feet
  • Awkward hand movements
  • Loss of balance
  • Clumsiness and stumbling
  • Sleep problems


Balance your B12, Balance your Nerves

Thyroid disease and low B12 levels

In a study conducted in Sapir Medical Center, Kfar Saba, Israel, patients with autoimmune thyroid disease received blood screening for vitamin B12 deficiency.  Researchers noted a significantly high percentage of people with AITD who also had vitamin B12 deficiency caused by pernicious anemia, a disease that inhibits proper absorption of vitamin B12.

Another study conducted in Pakistan by Aga Khan University produced similar results; namely, a 40% prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency among patients with hypothyroidism.

Hypothyroidism treatment

If you are a patient of hypothyroidism, then physicians strongly recommend routine blood testing for vitamin B12 deficiency, regardless of thyroid hormone levels.

Read more about B12 deficiency:

6 Degrees of Vitamin B12- B12 Deficiency and Autoimmune Disease

Worried about Low B12 Lab Results?

Female Rapper Missy Elliot, 15 Celebs with Thyroid Disorders


Prevalence and evaluation of B12 deficiency in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease- PubMed NCBI

Hypothyroidism- PubMed Health

Vitamin B12 deficiency common in primary hypothyroidism- PubMed NCBI

Hypothyroidism & Vitamin B12 Deficiency- LIVESTRONG.COM

Vitamin B12 deficiency common in primary hypothyroidism

Image credits, from top:

vitasamb2001, jscreationzs, Ambro

Balance your B12, Balance your Nerves

Friday, November 4th, 2011



If you’re having trouble finding balance, B12 deficiency might be the culprit.  Symptoms of vitamin B-12 deficiency- dizziness and nerve damage like ataxia (unsteady gait, difficulty keeping balance), and numbness or tingling in hands and feet require B12 supplements.


Vitamin B12 deficiency symptoms

Vitamin B12 occurs naturally in all meat, cheese, and egg products, but if you are one of millions of people who cannot absorb B12 efficiently, then you will start feeling symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency.  Some common emotional and cognitive signs of B12 deficiency are:

  • BALANCE YOUR B12, BALANCE YOUR NERVES, WWW.B12PATCH.COMChronic fatigue, sleepiness
  • Memory loss
  • Confusion
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Aggressiveness
  • Paranoia
  • Psychoses
  • Dementia

Nerve damage caused by B12 deficiency

In addition to psychiatric symptoms, vitamin B12 deficiency causes severe damage to your nerves, notably subacute combined degeneration (SCD) of the spinal cord- a severe neurological disorder caused by B-12 deficiency.  SCD causes damage in your spinal cord, brain, and peripheral nerves, beginning with the myelin sheathe.

BALANCE YOUR B12, BALANCE YOUR NERVES, WWW.B12PATCH.COM1- The myelin sheathe- your nervous system’s “ozone layer”
The myelin sheath is a protective covering that surrounds many of your nerves, providing a shield from potential danger.  The myelin sheathe also accelerates communication between your nerves and your many bodily sensors (hands, feet, tongue, nose, eyes).  Vitamin B12 aids your body in maintaining this essential protective mechanism, and low levels of B12 often result in a breakdown of the myelin sheathe.  

2- Communication breakdown

The nerves of your spinal cord rely on a steady inflow of information from your nerve sensors throughout your body.  Messages from the nerves in your legs, for example, flow along the spinal cord and to the brain, thus controlling movements like running, walking, skipping, and tapping your feet.  Nerve damage causes these signals to become misinterpreted, resulting in poor coordination, or gait ataxia.


3- Gait ataxia- taking the spring out of your step

A typical sign of abnormal neurological behavior resulting from B12 deficiency is gait ataxia, which is difficulty walking.  Gait ataxia is also one of the symptoms of pernicious anemia, red blood cell disease associated with prolonged vitamin B-12 deficiency.  Symptoms of gait ataxia are:

  • Unsteady gait, difficulty walking without stumbling
  • Difficulty staying balanced on one leg
  • Trembling awkward movements, clumsiness
  • Muscular weakness in the legs and arms
  • Spasticity
  • Hypotension (low blood pressure)
  • Vision problems, blurriness

4- Paresthesias- “pins and needles” and numbness sensations

An early sign of nerve damage related to vitamin B12 cobalamin deficiency is paresthesias, resulting in numbness and tingling in the hands and feet.  Paresthesias is a kind of peripheral neuropathy that affects the peripheral nerves that run along your spinal cord and to your extremities, thus causing that pins and needles sensation that you often feel in your hands and feet.


Do you have vitamin B12 deficiency?  Go ask a hematologist.

The only way to determine if you are indeed suffering from vitamin B12 deficiency is by getting a blood test.  If a physician diagnoses you with dangerously low levels of B12, then he may recommend B12 injections, which will require a prescription.


  • Vitamin B12- How much do you need?
  • Absorbing Vitamin B12, a Metabolic Gastrointestinal Journey
  • Sources:

    Image credits, from top:

    Vitamin B12- How much do you need?

    Wednesday, November 2nd, 2011



    Do you know how much vitamin B12 you need in order to avoid vitamin B12 deficiency? Unless you supplement, you could wind up with dangerously low vitamin B12 levels.  Find out if your B12 blood levels are normal and how much you need to meet the FDA’s RDA for vitamin B12.


    What are the symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency?

    Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin) is a water-soluble nutrient that your body gets from protein sources, such as beef, chicken, liver, fish, eggs, and dairy products.  Your body uses vitamin B12 for DNA synthesis, protecting your nervous system, and strengthening cognitive skills.  Symptoms that indicate a low vitamin B12 level include constant fatigue, difficulty concentrating, memory loss, tingling or numbness in your hands and feet, depression, agitation, altered taste perception, and red, swollen tongue.


    How much B12 is in my blood right now?

    By performing a blood test, your doctor can tell you if you are deficient in vitamin B12, or if you have normal B12 levels.  Vitamin B12 blood screening requires a 6-8 hour fast before testing.  Laboratory tests will measure how many picograms (pg) of cobalamin you have per milliliter (ml) of blood in your body.

    How much B12 should I have?

    • Scientists agree that a normal level of vitamin B12 in your blood is 200 – 900 picograms per milliliter (200-900 pg/ml).
    • Test results showing less than 200 pg/ml signal vitamin B12 deficiency.
    • For elderly adults, the recommended vitamin B12 level is much higher- Test results showing less than 500 pg/ml indicates B12 deficiency.
    • In order to find the cause of a vitamin B12 deficiency, doctors may perform a Schilling test.

    What is the recommended dose of vitamin B12?

    • The FDA’s RDA of vitamin B12 for healthy adults is approximately three mcg daily for males and females alike, including pregnant and nursing moms.
    • For elderly individuals, the recommended dose of vitamin B12 is 25-100 mcg per day.

    Scientific study proves that the RDA for B12 is off.

    • According to a study conducted in the Netherlands, elderly sufferers of vitamin B12 deficiency need more than the recommended daily allowance (RDA) in order to achieve normal levels of B12.
    • Using methylmalonic acid (MMA) levels as a gauge, scientists established that cyanocobalamin supplementation amounting to 200 times the RDA of vitamin B12 is required in order to stabilize B12 levels in patients showing signs of vitamin B12 deficiency.


    How much vitamin B12 do you really need?

    Celiac Disease Tip: Gluten Free Diet plus Extra Vitamin B12

    Wednesday, October 19th, 2011



    Sufferers of celiac disease follow a gluten free diet, but many don’t add vitamin B12. People with autoimmune disease or gluten intolerance getB12 deficiency more often than not, according to health experts.  Doctors advise sufferers of digestive diseases or pernicious anemia to supplement with B12.


    Celiac disease facts:

    “Alternative Names: Also classified as a disease of nutrient malabsorption, celiac disease is also known as celiac sprue, nontropical sprue and gluten-sensitive enteropathy.” –DiagnoseMe.com

    • CELIAC DISEASE TIP: GLUTEN FREE DIET PLUS EXTRA VITAMIN B12, WWW.B12PATCH.COMCeliac disease (Gluten Enteropathy) is a digestive disease that causes severe damage to the small intestine’s lining.
    • Celiac disease is also an autoimmune disease.  When any food containing gluten enters the body, the body proceeds to attack its own digestive system, harming the inner lining of the small intestine.
    • Gluten is a protein that occurs primarily in wheat, rye, and barley.  All baked goods, snacks, or condiments that contain gluten are hazardous to patients with celiac disease.
    • Celiac disease patients have difficulty digesting vitamins and minerals from food sources, particularly vitamin B12, which can lead to severe vitamin B12 deficiency.
    • Some symptoms of celiac disease include diarrhea, stomach cramping, nausea, flatulence, blood in the stool, pernicious anemia caused by B12 deficiency, and stunted growth.
    • There is no confirmed cure for celiac disease.  Physicians recommend lifestyle changes, such as following a gluten-free diet and supplementing with vitamin B12.

    Vitamin B12 deficiency: What’s the connection?

    “Since most B12 in our diets comes from animal products, vegans are at risk for B12 deficiency. Crohn’s and celiac disease, weight loss surgery, and chronic alcoholism can all interfere with a person’s ability to absorb enough of the nutrients they need. Seniors have more problems with nutrient absorption and malnutrition as well.”  –WebMD

    • CELIAC DISEASE TIP: GLUTEN FREE DIET PLUS EXTRA VITAMIN B12, WWW.B12PATCH.COMVitamin B12 is a water-soluble nutrient that occurs naturally in protein sources such as beef, chicken, fish, eggs, and milk products.
    • Your body needs vitamin B12 for the nervous system, building red blood cells, mental clarity, maintaining metabolism, and preventing dementia.
    • According to one study, celiac disease patients run a high risk of developing vitamin deficiencies.  Out of over 400 celiac disease patients, 12% suffered folate deficiency and 5% were deficient in vitamin B12.  Among men, 33% had iron deficiency, while 19% of women had low iron levels.
    • Scientists conclude that damage to the small intestine in celiac disease patients prevents them from properly absorbing nutrients, thus causing severe malnourishment.
    • Scientists also speculate that following a gluten-free diet might also contribute to vitamin deficiencies, adding that many gluten-free products lack sufficient B vitamins, calcium, iron, zinc, magnesium, fiber or vitamin D.

    Vitamin B12 deficiency symptoms and treatment

    • CELIAC DISEASE TIP: GLUTEN FREE DIET PLUS EXTRA VITAMIN B12, WWW.B12PATCH.COMOnly a blood screening for low B12 can confirm if you have vitamin B12 deficiency.
    • Some symptoms of B12 deficiency include fatigue, depression, psychosis, memory loss, brain fog, tingling or numbness in the hands and/or feet, altered taste perception, and loss of balance.
    • Unless treated, vitamin B12 deficiency could escalate into severe neurological damage, dementia (Alzheimer’s disease), and increased risk for heart attack and stroke.  (See B Vitamins prevent Cardiovascular Disease- B6, B12 and Folate.)
    • In some cases, following a gluten-free diet is effective at maintaining vitamin B12 levels.
    • For people who exhibit celiac disease symptoms in addition to symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency, doctors advise immediate supplementation of B12.
    • Vitamin B12 supplementation can include weekly B12 injections, and may follow up with sublingual vitamin B12 tablets.
    • For many, B12 shots cause bruising, and are extremely painful, as they require insertion into thick, muscular tissue. A popular option is to supplement with an alternative weekly over-the-counter (OTC) vitamin B12 supplement, which administers the same amount of vitamin B12 as the B12 injections, without the pain, and doesn’t require prescription.

    Related reading:

    Cruising for a Bruising? Choose Vitamin B12 Shots or Anemia

    Gluten-Free Candy List for Celiac Disease, October 2011

    Signs and Symptoms of 6 Types of Anemia Blood Disease


    Celiac Disease: Gluten Free Diet

    Low Serum Vitamin B12 is Common in Celiac Disease and is not due to Autoimmune Gastritis- Celiac.com

    Vitamin B12 deficiency in untreated celiac disease- PubMed- NCBI

    Gluten Sensitivity / Celiac Disease – Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Information

    What Do You Know About Vitamin B12 Deficiency?

    Image Credits:

    graur codrinGrant Cochranepiyato, ambro

    Signs and Symptoms of 6 Types of Anemia Blood Disease

    Wednesday, October 5th, 2011



    Pernicious Anemia, Sickle Cell, and Others: Anemia is a serious blood disease resulting in low blood cell production; aside from vitamin B12 deficiency from pernicious anemia, how many other types of anemia are there?


    What are the different kinds of anemia?

    There are six general types of anemia.  They include:

    Pernicious Anemia (PA)

    Pernicious anemia is an acquired disease that causes vitamin B12 deficiency.  Vitamin B12 is crucial for producing healthy red blood cells, in addition to supporting your nervous system, promoting mental clarity, and optimizing your metabolism. With pernicious anemia, you are unable to absorb vitamin B12 from natural food sources, resulting in severe depletion of vitamin B12 levels in your blood.

    Symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency include:

    • fatigue
    • dizziness
    • tingling in your hands and/or feet
    • “brain fog”
    • memory loss
    • depression
    • aggression.

    If diagnosed with pernicious anemia, your doctor may recommend weekly vitamin B12 injections, which are inserted in the thick thigh muscle or buttock.  Vitamin B12 shots require a prescription, may cause bruising, and are usually painful.

    As an alternative, patients may opt for gentle over-the-counter (OTC) vitamin B12 supplements that don’t  require injection.

    Also read: B12 Deficiency can really Get on your Nerves

    Hemolytic Anemia (HA)

    Hemolytic anemia occurs when red blood cells are destroyed (hemolysis) at a rate that is quicker than their reproduction in bone marrow.  People who have hemolytic anemia have either inherited it as a genetic disease, or acquired it later in life.  Mild hemolytic anemia does not usually require treatment, but severe anemia can be life-threatening, requiring blood transfusions, steroids, or splenectomy.

    Sickle Cell Anemia (SCA)

    Sickle cell anemia is an inherited blood disease.  In sickle cell anemia, abnormally shaped hemoglobin cells become obstructed in small blood vessels, causing pain and possible organ damage to the anemic individual.  There is no cure for sickle cell anemia, but therapies for reducing the symptoms of anemia include antibiotics, pain relievers, and blood transfusions.


    Aplastic Anemia (AA)

    Aplastic anemia is a blood disease that can be life threatening.  In aplastic anemia, your bone marrow is unable to produce sufficient amounts of crucial blood cells, including red blood cells, white blood cells, and blood platelets.  Diagnosis of anemia includes testing that indicates low blood count of any of the three blood cells types.  Causes of aplastic anemia include autoimmune disease (most common) or exposure to chemotherapy and other types of radiation.  Possible treatments for aplastic anemia include bone marrow transplants, blood transfusions, and restraining of the immune system.  Untreated, aplastic anemia can be fatal.

    Fanconi Anemia (FA)

    Fanconi anemia is a rare blood disorder, and it is inherited as a genetic disease. Fanconi anemia involves bone marrow failure, and can lead to myelogenous leukemia. Even with bone marrow transplants, patients of Fanconi anemia rarely live past the age of thirty.

    Bone Marrow Disease Anemia

    Sometimes, bone marrow diseases, such as leukemia and myelodysplasia (pre-leukemia), create symptoms of anemia in patients, as diseased bone marrow causes inadequate production of red blood cells.

    Related reading:

    “I’ve heard of the X Factor and Fear Factor…But what’s Intrinsic Factor?”

    B12 Deficiency: Don’t Ignore the Symptoms

    AIDS with B12 Deficiency


    Anemia: Types of Anemia- Healthplus24.com

    What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Pernicious Anemia? -NHLBI, NIH

    Images courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net

    Justin Bieber among 10 Celeb “Beliebers” in Vitamin B12 Shots

    Wednesday, June 1st, 2011



    Which stars rely on vitamin B12 boost for energy? Celebrities like Madonna, Kate Perry and musical boy genius Justin Bieber get vitamin B12 injections regularly. Find out why.


    Q: What are B12 shots, and what  are their benefits, anyways?

    A: Vitamin B12 shots are usually given to people with vitamin B12 deficiency , but stars are also finding that the benefits of vitamin B12 shots include:

    • Weight loss
    • Energy
    • Clear skin
    • Thick hair
    • Stress reduction

    Not bad, for one water-soluble vitamin. B12 shots are painful, though, and you have to take them in the buttocks. (Ouch!)

    Here are the top 10 most famous celebrities who rave about their vitamin B12 shots:

    #1 & #2- Justin Bieber told Chelsea Handler in an interview on her E! network show that he was feeling a little wiped out, but wasn’t looking forward to getting a B-12 shot, “in his butt.” The late night comedienne and former Playboy model is also a fan of B12 shots. She once even posted a pic on Twitter of herself getting a B12 shot in her bare behind.


    Madonna carries B12 on the go

    #3 & #4- Madonna got Justin Timberlake hooked on vitamin B12 injections. Timberlake, when he was asked to speak about Madonna’s induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, told the audience all about his first B12 experience: Madonna was visiting him in a recording studio, when she whipped a syringe out of her purse, told Justin to drop trou, and proceeded to give him a shot of B12 right on the spot! He’s been taking B12 for increased energy ever since. B12: Celebs Say it’s the New C

    #5- Katy Perry receives routine vitamin B12 injections for health. The sultry singer, married to British comedian Russel Brand, told reporters that she takes vitamin B and steroids. 100 Best Sites for Fibromyalgia or Chronic Fatigue Information


    Katy P Needs her B

    #6- Cher Lloyd has raised a lot of eyebrows on the UK show, The X Factor, for bullying the other reality show competitors and acting like a stressed out teenzilla. It’s no wonder that mentor Cheryl Cole advised her to go to a clinic for a vitamin B12 shot, which she explained would help her fight chronic fatigue, nervousness and low immunity. Along with giving Cher more energy, the vitamin B12 supplements have also helped her deal with her stage fright. Got PMS? Let B Vitamins Ease your Pain

    #7- Pirates of the Caribbean star, Penelope Cruz, says, “I can’t live without my vitamin B.” She takes vitamin B supplements to help her stick to her diet, resist the urge for sweets and for well-being.  It’s National Nutrition Month: Are You Eating Your 5 Colors a Day?


    Johnny and Penelope at Pirates opening

    #8-  Lindsay Lohan- Like Cher Lloyd, Lindsay has also had her share of teen antics, including many all-night parties and club-hopping. To get her back into shape the morning after, Lindsay often demands a dose of B12 for energy, focus and mental balance. 7 Reasons You Have Brain Fog…And What to do About It

    #9- Ex-Spice Girl Victoria Beckham has been vocal about her use of vitamin supplements, including B12, to stay healthy and alert during her pregnancies. Pregnant Moms and Low B-12 Levels: Let ‘em Eat Steak!


    #10 Prince didn’t miss the bus on vitamin B12, either. The 58-year-old crooner, once voted “Sexiest Vegetarian” gets his vitamin B12 shots before every concert to give him the stamina he needs to strut his stuff on-stage.  6 Must-Eat Foods for Die-Hard Vegans

    Read more about vitamin B12 deficiency and how to prevent it:

    “I’ve heard of the X Factor and Fear FactorBut what’s Intrinsic Factor?”

    B12 Deficiency can really Get on your Nerves

    Vitamin B12 for Healthy Hair, Skin and Nails










    Avoiding Vitamin B12 Deficiency while Breast Feeding

    Monday, May 16th, 2011



    If you’re pregnant or breastfeeding, it’s important to know your vitamin B12 levels, in order to avoid vitamin B12 deficiency, which can cause harm to your baby and also make you feel severe fatigue, depression, and early symptoms of nerve damage.


    What is Vitamin B12?

    Vitamin B12 is a water-soluble nutrient which your body needs to maintain a healthy nervous system, produce ample amounts of red blood cells, support brain functioning and promote good metabolism.

    Vitamin B12 also monitors homocysteine, an amino acid which is associated with increased risk for heart attack and stroke.

    How can I include vitamin B12 in my diet?

    Animal proteins are especially high in vitamin B12. For that reason, vegans are warned to get B12 supplementation regularly in order to avoid B12 deficiency. Food sources which are rich in vitamin B12 include:

    • Lean meats, particularly beef chuck and organ meats, such as liver, kidneys and heart
    • Fish, including salmon and halibut, and shellfish, such as clam, crab, mussels and oysters
    • Dairy products, including Swiss cheese, yogurt and milk
    • Eggs
    • Fortified cereals

    On Becoming Vegan: Avoiding Vitamin B12 Deficiency and Others


    What are the symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency?

    Vitamin B12 deficiency can only be diagnosed through a blood screening. It’s important to recognize vitamin B12 deficiency symptoms in the early stages, in order to prevent serious nerve damage, memory loss,  mood disorders, and increased risk for heart attack or stroke.

    Some of the symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency are:

    • Chronic fatigue
    • Sleep difficulties
    • Aggressiveness
    • Hallucinations
    • Weakness
    • Short-term memory loss
    • Heart palpitations
    • Numb feeling in hands and feet
    • Altered taste perception
    • Decreased motor control

    B12 Deficiency: Don’t Ignore the Symptoms

    Are nursing mothers at risk for getting vitamin B12 deficiency?

    Breast feeding mothers are more likely to suffer vitamin deficiencies than mothers who bottle-feed.  This is because they share a significant amount of nutrients they consume with their baby. In order to maintain healthy levels of vitamin B12, nursing moms must make up the difference by either taking vitamin B12 supplements or increasing their consumption of B12 in their diet.

    Pregnant Moms and Low B-12 Levels: Let ‘em Eat Steak!


    If I nurse often, is my baby still at risk for becoming deficient in vitamin B12?

    Cow’s milk and baby formula are rich sources of vitamin B12, and so is the breast milk of a mother with healthy levels of vitamin B12.

    The milk of a nursing mother who has vitamin B12 deficiency, however, will likewise have low levels of vitamin B12.

    Furthermore, while an adult could harbor low B12 levels for a long time before showing any symptoms of depletion, a malnourished infant can use up his vitamin B12 stores much more rapidly, leaving a very small window of opportunity for treatment.

    If left untreated, vitamin B12 deficiency in infants could lead to:

    • Severe vomiting
    • Lethargy
    • Anemia
    • Stinted brain development
    • Failure to thrive
    • Death

    Are Vegans in France Responsible for Breast-fed Baby’s Death?

    What vitamin B12 supplements are available for me and my baby?

    Nursing vegan moms and pregnant women are strongly advised to supplement with vitamin B12. If vitamin B12 deficiency is diagnosed, your physician might prescribe vitamin B12 injections.

    Also read:

    Natalie Portman Chooses B12 over Veganism

    Vitamin-Enriched Chocolate Milk Facing School Ban



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