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Posts Tagged ‘b12 vitamin’

Are you Glee-ful over Vitamin B12? Actress Lea Michele is…

Friday, November 11th, 2011



For years, vitamin B12 has been the staple energy vitamin for stars such as Madonna, Justin Timberlake, and Prince.  Now, B12 vitamins are part of Glee star Lea Michele’s regimen against vitamin B12 deficiency. Find out why celebrities such as Lea Michele rely on B12 supplements for added stamina, strength, and mental focus.


The Glee star’s secret to weight loss

How does Lea Michele, who plays the bossy, competitive, (and sometimes infuriating) Rachel on Glee keep her figure?  Recently, she confessed to following a strictly macrobiotic vegan diet, composed of mostly vegetables, grains, and beans. By cutting out meat, chicken, and dairy products from her diet, Lea has managed to lose ten pounds since she first started filming on the set.

Vitamin B12 for Weight Loss- Why it Works

How does she avoid B12 deficiency?

Lea admits to also eating a few servings of fish per week, in order to avoid getting vitamin B12 deficiency.  Since Vitamin B12 occurs only in animal-based foods, such as meat, fish, poultry, eggs, and milk, supplementing with extra vitamin B12 is crucial for avoiding low B12 blood levels.  How does she justify introducing a non-vegan source into her vegan diet?  Apparently, macrobiotic veganism makes special allowances for seafood.  Lea Michele understands that a diet low in vitamin B12 is a diet that leads to B12 deficiency symptoms.


Balance your B12, Balance your Nerves

What are the symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency?

People who deplete their stores of vitamin B12 encounter symptoms such as extreme fatigue, muscular weakness, depression, diminished coordination, memory loss, and frequent numbness or tingling sensations (pins and needles) in their hands, arms, legs, and feet. Untreated, vitamin B12 deficiency may escalate into severe memory loss, neurological damage, osteoporosis, and increased risk for heart attack, and stroke.

6 Degrees of Vitamin B12- B12 Deficiency and Autoimmune Disease

How does vitamin B12 benefit an active lifestyle?

Vitamin B12 influences a wide range of bodily functions- by ensuring balanced B12 levels in your blood supply, you feel more energized, stimulated, confident, and “gleeful.”

  • Vitamin B12 is instrumental in DNA synthesis
  • Vitamin B12 protects your nervous system
  • Vitamin B12 boosts your metabolism
  • Vitamin B12 controls homocysteine levels, reducing your risk of heart disease and stroke
  • Vitamin B12 supports cognitive functioning
  • Vitamin B12 protects you from vitamin deficiency symptoms of fatigue, depression, anxiety, and “brain fog”
  • Vitamin B12 helps you stay on track with your fitness regimen and enables you to make better food choices

Read more about the many health benefits of vitamin B12:

Justin Bieber among 10 Celeb “Beliebers” in Vitamin B12 Shots

The Many Benefits of Vitamin B12…


Lea Michele Bikini Body Secrets Includes Diet, B12 Shots

Vitamin B12 | ‘Glee’ The star Lea Michele surprisingly fit

Lea Michele Injects B12 and Eats Fish, According to ASOS Magazine

Image credits, from top:

gospelportals, karlnorling,

The Many Benefits of Vitamin B12…

Thursday, November 3rd, 2011



Vitamin B12 benefits your nervous system and many other biochemical reactions;  Find out how Vitamin B12 supplements can help you live a healthier lifestyle.



What is vitamin B12?

Vitamin B-12 (Cobalamin) is an essential nutrient that occurs naturally in protein food sources, such as beef, poultry, fish, eggs, and milk.  The B12 vitamin is one of the B-complex vitamins.  Other B vitamins are vitamin B9 (folate) and vitamin B3 (niacin).



B12 Benefits

Vitamin B12 is important for many bodily functions.  B12 helps your body produce red blood cells, regulates your nervous system, boosts your immunity, and protects cognitive functioning.  Some other benefits of vitamin B12 include lowering your risk for heart attack and stroke by regulating homocysteine levels.


B12 Deficiency: Don’t Ignore the Symptoms


What is the best way to get vitamin B12?

The best way to get enough vitamin B12 in your diet is by eating plenty of lean meats, chicken, fish, eggs, and dairy products. Foods that have the highest levels of vitamin B12 are clams, oysters, beef liver, and halibut. 

However, eating B12-rich foods does not guarantee against vitamin B12 deficiency.  Some people are unable to digest B12 naturally from foods, and must take B12 supplements in order to avoid symptoms of malnourishment, such as fatigue, depression, irritability, numbness in hands and feet, memory loss, and difficulty concentrating.

Most physicians prescribe vitamin B12 shots, sublingual B12, or b12 vitamins after diagnosing B12 deficiency.

Read more about vitamin B12 benefits:

Vitamin B12- How much do you need?

Cruising for a Bruising? Choose Vitamin B12 Shots or Anemia

Signs and Symptoms of 6 Types of Anemia Blood Disease


Benefits Of Taking Vitamin B12- LIVESTRONG.COM

Image credits, from top:

jscreationzs, Maggie Smith, Idea go, Paul, Suat Eman

Celiac and B12- Celiac Disease and Vitamin B12 Deficiency

Friday, October 28th, 2011



Celiac disease and vitamin B12 deficiency are interrelated, but many celiacs are unaware of the high risk for developing vitamin B-12 deficiency. Like celiac disease, vitamin B12 deficiency is sometimes an autoimmune disorder brought on by pernicious anemia.


What is vitamin B-12?

Vitamin B12, “cyanocobalamin,” is an essential nutrient that occurs in protein foods, such as beef and chicken liver, oysters, shrimp, cheese, yogurt, and eggs. Vitamin B12 is water-soluble, and is stored in the liver

B12 is crucial for healthy red blood cell production, for protecting your nervous system, for supporting cardiovascular health, and for sustaining normal cognitive functioning, such as memory, thinking skills, and logic.

What are the symptoms of vitamin B-12 deficiency?

If you are unable to sustain sufficient amounts of B12 in your liver, then you may start to feel tired, depressed, and disoriented.  You might notice a numbing or tingling sensation in your hands and feet, described as “pins and needles.” 

You might also notice that you have a hard time remembering important dates or meetings, or finding the right word while talking to somebody or sending an e-mail.

(Read Feed your Brain Something You’ll never Forget)

Some side effects and/or complications that may arise unless you receive treatment for vitamin B12 deficiency:

  • Chronic fatigue
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Paranoia
  • Aggressiveness
  • Distractedness
  • Short-term memory loss
  • Loss of physical balance
  • Tingling-numbing in extremities
  • Red, swollen tongue
  • Altered taste perception
  • Malnourishment
  • Anemia
  • Increased risk for heart disease or stroke
  • Osteoporosis
  • Liver disease
  • Dementia, such as Alzheimer’s disease
  • Severe neurological damage


What is celiac disease?

Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley.  Celiac patients and others with gluten intolerance must avoid all products containing gluten- baked goods, packaged snacks, and a long list of food additives- in order to avoid symptoms.

Celiac disease is one of many autoimmune diseases that occur with vitamin B12 deficiency.  With celiac, patients who eat any foods containing gluten experience painful symptoms such as stomach cramps, diarrhea, nausea, and achiness.  That is because their immune system identifies gluten as a threat, and begins to attack traces of gluten in the digestive system, causing severe damage to the intestinal tract. 

Why are celiac disease patients at risk for vitamin B12 deficiency?

Scientists don’t claim that celiac disease is an outright cause of low vitamin B12, but they have noted a strong correlation- enough to warrant extensive research and recommendations.

In order to digest nutrients such as vitamin B12 properly, you need to have a healthy digestive system.  People with autoimmune diseases that cause gastrointestinal damage, such as Hashimoto’s disease, Crohn’s disease, and celiac diseases, are unable to absorb nutrients from dietary sources because of damage to their stomach linings, small intestines or colon.  

For them, malabsorption often leads to anemia, osteoporosis, chronic fatigue, and peripheral neuropathy in the hands and feet (thus the tingling and numbness).

Parasitic Worms for Crohn’s Disease- Friendly Gut Bugs

Celiac disease patients, and others who can’t absorb vitamin B12

Besides celiac disease, other factors can make it difficult for your body to absorb enough vitamin B12:

  • Chronic alcoholism
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Inability to produce intrinsic factor, a necessary protein for B12 vitamin absorption
  • Gastrointestinal surgeries (gastric bypass, IBD surgery) that involve removing your ileum, a part of your small intestine that helps you digest vitamin B12 from food
  • Long-time usage of heartburn medications
  • Following a vegan diet



Does following a gluten-free diet cure vitamin B12 deficiency?

Not entirely; according to research by the University of Edinburgh, people who suffer celiac disease, but do not receive treatment, have a 41% chance of developing vitamin B12 deficiency. 

In celiac patients who started following a gluten-free diet, most of their symptoms disappeared.  However, a significant amount of celiacs continued to suffer neuropathic symptoms such as tingling and numbness, and those side effects did not disappear until they brought their vitamin B12 levels back to normal with routine vitamin B12 supplements.


Read more about preventing vitamin B12 deficiency:

Absorbing Vitamin B12, a Metabolic Gastrointestinal Journey

6 Degrees of Vitamin B12- B12 Deficiency and Autoimmune Disease

Gastrointestinal Surgery for Crohn’s (IBD) and B12 Warnings


Anemia-B12 Deficiency- University of Maryland Medical Center

Celiac Disease & Vitamin B12 Deficiency- LIVESTRONG.COM

Vitamin B12 deficiency in untreated celiac disease- PubMed – NCBI

Images, from top: Artis.Rozentālsphotostock, rmkoske, Cooking Gluten Free

Folic Acid and B12: Your Nerves Need Both to Thrive

Thursday, March 24th, 2011



Folic acid (vitamin B-6), the synthetic version of folate, has been instrumental in reducing the number of neural tube birth defects, ever since the US government  mandated that all breads and other grain products be infused with this essential B vitamin; pregnant women are strongly advised to include folate supplementation in their diet.

But folic acid alone is ineffective in nourishing the nervous system; for that, it requires help from vitamin B12.

Folic acid + B12 = healthy nerves

A study found that both folic acid and vitamin B12, taken together, produced the most beneficial results in regards to nerve function.

  • A Tufts University study examined 1,459 individuals over the age of 60.
  • 25% had vitamin B12 deficiency, and likewise scored poorly on mental acuity testing.
  • Of the participants who has B12 deficiency, the ones who also had folic acid deficiency turned out the worst scores- 5 times below the average for healthy individuals of that age.
  • The elderly are particularly at risk because of their inability to utilize B12 vitamins naturally.
  • According to the Journal of American Medical Association, folic acid and vitamin B12 taken together may be used to treat heart disease and reduce the number of related deaths in the US.
  • Clinical research has shown that folic acid is effective for reducing homocysteine levels, a precursor to heart disease, but that the addition of vitamin B12 accounts for an extra 7% success rate.

Vitamin B12 occurs naturally in meat, fish, dairy and egg products. Vegans and vegetarians must rely on B12 supplements in order to avoid B12 deficiency.

Folic acid is found in all cereals, baked goods and other grain products, ever since the US government ruled back in 1998 that it be included in order to prevent birth defects.


Science Daily, the Journal of American Medical Association, Oprah.com

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