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Posts Tagged ‘Crohn’s Disease’

Stomach Bloating from B12 Deficiency? Yes, It Happens.

Thursday, October 17th, 2013

 

 

If you suffer from constant lot of stomach bloating and other signs of indigestion, it can be linked to vitamin B12 deficiency. Your ability to digest vitamin B12 and use it to prevent pernicious anemia can be traced directly to the environment in your gut. Symptoms of stomach bloating can be the first clue in distinguishing why you’re suffering from vitamin B12 deficiency, and how to prevent it.

Stomach Bloating from B12 Deficiency? Yes, It Happens.

Vitamin B12 malabsorption

When your digestive system is not working properly, then you’re not getting enough vitamin B12. That’s because unlike other vitamins, B12 cannot be absorbed from foods without the help of certain digestive enzymes that are produced by your parietal cells of the stomach.  

Gastritis (stomach inflammation) is one of several causes of vitamin B12 malabsorption.

So even though you eat plenty of meat, chicken, and fish, you aren’t getting the vitamin B12 you need in order to survive. And it all stems from your gastrointestinal health.

What Causes Vitamin B12 Malabsorption?

Pernicious anemia occurs in the stomach

Intrinsic factor is one such protein that your body needs, both to extract cobalamin (vitamin B12) from food and to utilize it efficiently so that it reaches your blood stream.

But with digestive disorders such as Crohn’s disease, or if there is any type of damage to your esophagus, stomach walls, or intestinal tract, then you run a high risk for vitamin B12 deficiency, and possibly pernicious anemia.

So while people assume that pernicious anemia is a blood disease, it really begins in the stomach, with bloating, acid reflux, and heartburn.

Symptoms of stomach disorders

The following symptoms, if they occur often, may indicate a breakdown in your digestive system that requires immediate treatment in order to prevent vitamin B12 deficiency and many other ailments:

  • Acid reflux
  • Heartburn
  • Vomiting
  • Abdominal pain
  • Chest pains
  • Shortness of breath
  • Nausea
  • Stomach bloating
  • Hardening of the stomach
  • Loss of appetite
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • “Lump” in your throat
  • Diarrhea
  • Constipation
  • Frequent burping
  • Flatulence

IBD or IBS- What’s the Difference in a Tummy Ache?

Comorbid illnesses

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are comorbid with vitamin B12 deficiency, as are many other autoimmune disorders and chronic pain conditions.

The following illnesses and health problems cause damage to the stomach that may also lead to vitamin B12 deficiency:

  • Crohn’s disease
  • Ulcerative colitis
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)
  • Migraines
  • Celiac disease
  • Stomach ulcers
  • Diverticulitis
  • Esophageal stricture

Please tell us…

Have you been experiencing stomach bloating and other signs of digestive disorders, but didn’t realize they were connected to vitamin B12 deficiency?

Do you have any questions or suggestions?  Please leave your comments below.

Share with your friends!

If you found this article helpful, then please share with your friends, family, and coworkers by email, twitter, or Facebook.

Like this? Read more:

Vitamin B12 Deficiency Caused by H. Pylori Infection

Here’s your Crohn’s Disease Survival Kit

Image courtesy of Ohmega1982/freedigitalphotos

What Causes Pernicious Anemia?

Thursday, October 10th, 2013

 

 

There are many causes of pernicious anemia, including autoimmune conditions, medications, and damage to the intestines. Vitamin B12 deficiency caused by vegan dieting is not considered a cause of pernicious anemia, as it can be reversed by eating foods containing ample amounts of vitamin B12.

What Causes Pernicious Anemia?

Digestive illnesses

Crohn’s disease, celiac, and fibromyalgia can impair your ability to produce intrinsic factor, a digestive enzyme that is needed in order to extract vitamin B12 from food and replenish supplies of vitamin B12 in the blood stream. Pernicious anemia is often comorbid with illnesses that affect the gastrointestinal system. For prevention, check vitamin B12 levels routinely and supplement with non-pill forms of vitamin B12.

Shocking Must-See Video on Vitamin B12 Deficiency Crisis

Genetics

If either of your parents or grandparents suffered from pernicious anemia, then you are also a high risk category for vitamin B12 deficiency. With frequent testing, you can catch the onset of vitamin B12 deficiency before it advances to pernicious anemia.

Pernicious Anemia- What’s your Risk?

Medication-induced vitamin B12 deficiency

Certain medications can eventually impair your ability to absorb vitamin B12, leading to pernicious anemia; these include PPIs used to treat GERD (acid reflux), metformin for diabetes, and various antibiotics, NSAIDs and antidepressants. If you are on long-term medication, check to see if you are a risk factor for megaloblastic anemia and use vitamin B12 supplements.

25 Medications that Cause Vitamin B12 Deficiency

Gastrointestinal surgery

If you have had bariatric surgery (gastric bypass) or surgical treatments for illnesses such as Crohn’s disease, then pernicious anemia may result because of vitamin B12 malabsorption. To prevent vitamin B12 deficiency, supplement with non-oral forms of vitamin B12.

Please tell us…

Do you get enough vitamin B12 to prevent symptoms of pernicious anemia, or would you feel better if your doctor would prescribe more vitamin B12?

Do you have any questions or suggestions?  Please leave your comments below.

Share with your friends!

If you found this article helpful, then please share with your friends, family, and coworkers by email, twitter, or Facebook.

Like this? Read more:

Is Pernicious Anemia Megaloblastic?

Vitamin B12 Deficiency and Bariatric Surgery

What are the Symptoms of Pernicious Anemia- B12 deficiency?

Image courtesy of keepingtime_ca/flickr

Absorbing Vitamin B12, a Metabolic Gastrointestinal Journey

Wednesday, October 26th, 2011

 

 

Vitamin B-12 (Cobalamin) originates in most protein foods, but even meat-eaters can get vitamin B12 deficiency. Absorbing vitamin B12 is a tricky process, and people who lack the intrinsic factor protein are unable to digest vitamin B12 from natural sources.  Learning about B12 supplement absorption is essential for avoiding B-12 deficiency symptoms.

ABSORBING VITAMIN B12- A METABOLIC GASTROINTESTINAL JOURNEY, WWW.B12PATCH.COM

Vitamin B12- What is it?

Vitamin B12, a member of the B-complex family of vitamins, is a water-soluble protein.  Most of the vitamin B12 that you eat comes from meat sources, as animal microorganisms produce it. Beef, liver, chicken, fish, and shellfish are some of the richest sources of vitamin B-12, in addition to eggs, cheese, and other dairy products.  The only widely confirmed vegan form of B12 occurs in brewer’s yeast.

This is your Body on B12

The benefits of vitamin B12 for your body are expansive.

  • Vitamin B12 assists in producing oxygen-carrying red blood cells.
  • Vitamin B12 also protects the myelin sheathe, which protects your nervous system.
  • Vitamin B12 benefits cognitive functioning- Cognitive health treatments are essential for treating symptoms of autism, and to delay the early onset of dementia.
  • Supplementing with vitamin B12 boosts stamina, sustains the memory, enhances mental focus, and imparts feelings of well-being in individuals who suffer from vitamin B12 deficiency.
  • Long-term vitamin B12 deficiency causes depression, anxiety, fatigue, memory loss, and numbness/tingling in the extremities. 

    (B12 Deficiency: Don’t Ignore the Symptoms)

Most People Digest B12 like this…

ABSORBING VITAMIN B12- A METABOLIC GASTROINTESTINAL JOURNEY, WWW.B12PATCH.COMVitamin B12’s journey through your body is a complicated, tricky procedure, and many things can go wrong.

  • 1. When you consume dietary vitamin B12 (from food), it immediately clings to hydrochloric acid and pepsin, a gastric enzyme that your body makes- except for when it doesn’t. (More on this later.)
  • 2. In your stomach, digestive acids separate vitamin B12 (cobalamin) from its protein part.  Also in your stomach, gastric parietal cells produce a substance called intrinsic factor- a necessary glycoprotein for digesting B12.
  • 3. Vitamin B12 combines with “R protein,” thus becoming B-complex.  B complex, along with intrinsic factor, travels to the small intestine.
  • 4. In the small intestine, R protein and B-complex separate.  B12 then attaches itself to intrinsic factor.
  • 5. The B12/intrinsic factor complex travels through the small intestine, finally arriving at the very bottom, where it reaches the terminal ileum.  The ileum then absorbs the vitamin B12 and distributes it into your bloodstream, where it is then stored in the liver.

Things that can go wrong with vitamin B12 Absorption

Some people are unable to digest vitamin B12 properly from food, and must instead receive vitamin B12 injections, which go directly into the bloodstream, bypassing the need for digestion.

  • You don’t have intrinsic factor. Lack of intrinsic factor is an autoimmune response, in which autoantibodies destroy intrinsic factor proteins produced in the stomach.  Since intrinsic factor is required in order to digest B12, the only way to avoid B12 deficiency is to bypass digestion by taking vitamin B12 supplements.
  • You are among the elderly. The majority of senior citizens don’t produce the amount of stomach acids needed to break down B12 for digestion.  Even the minimum amount of vitamin B12 recommended by physicians is not enough to avoid dementia caused by B12 deficiency, so elderly individuals are a high-risk group.  To prevent early-onset Alzheimer’s disease or neurological damage, transdermal vitamin B12 is advisable.
  • You take heartburn medication. As with the elderly, people who have GERD, or others who frequently take medicine for acid-reflux, including pregnant women, are susceptible to B12 deficiency.
  • You have had your ileum removed. Gastric bypass patients are at high risk for developing vitamin B12 deficiency, as are other patients of gastrointestinal surgery, such as sufferers of Crohn’s disease.  Unfortunately, many surgeons neglect to warn their patients about complications regarding vitamin B12 deficiency, and many bariatric surgery patients don’t find out about it until the symptoms- depression, fatigue, brain fog- become too hard to ignore.
  • You are a vegan. The vegan diet is largely devoid of B-12 sources, so unless you are a vegetarian who eats eggs, fish, or dairy, then you must take regular vitamin B12 supplements in order to avoid B12 deficiency.
  • You are diabetic. Metformin, a diabetes drug, interferes with the absorption of vitamin B12.
  • You have an autoimmune disease. Many autoimmune diseases such as celiac disease, fibromyalgia, and chronic fatigue syndrome are highly correlated with B12 deficiency.  Scientists are unsure as to the exact cause, but they have noted a decrease in symptoms such as fatigue, irritability, and depression with the inclusion of vitamin B12 supplements.

Related:

Getting Enough Vitamin B12? Three Reasons Why You Might Not Be

Vitamin Deficiencies can drive you Crazy- Seriously! Part 1

Parasitic Worms for Crohn’s Disease- Friendly Gut Bugs

Sources:

The Importance of Vitamin B12 for Your Body

Where is b12 absorbed in the body?

How Is Vitamin B12 Absorbed by the Body?

What Do You Know About Vitamin B12 Deficiency?

Low Vitamin B12 Level in Elderly May Spur Dementia

myelin sheath (anatomy) — Britannica Online Encyclopedia

Images: Wikimedia Commons, Free Digital Photos

Parasitic Worms for Crohn’s Disease- Friendly Gut Bugs

Tuesday, October 4th, 2011

 

 

Got Colitis? Skip Tequila, Go for the Worm: Scientists believe they have a cure for Crohn’s disease and celiac, and it involves using parasitic hookworms.  Here are some other surprising natural options for managing autoimmune disease.

PARASITIC WORMS FOR CROHN’S DISEASE- FRIENDLY GUT BUGS, WWW.B12PATCH.COM

Are we killing ourselves with hygiene?

Clean bottled drinking water, sub-zero refrigeration, anti-bacterial gels, dirt-free playgrounds, and sanitized kitchen counters- what do all these things all have in common?

If you guessed that these things all help to prevent disease, then guess again.

According to scientists, our standards of cleanliness are backfiring, killing healthy microscopic parasites that our bodies need to thrive.

Unlike people living in impoverished countries, where bug-ridden sacks of grain are commonly dealt with, we, with our clean, white processed bags of flour are nevertheless exclusive in our propensity for developing autoimmune diseases such as Inflammatory Bowel Disorder (IBD), Multiple Sclerosis (MS), and asthma.

PARASITIC WORMS FOR CROHN’S DISEASE- FRIENDLY GUT BUGS, WWW.B12PATCH.COM

Dish out the dirt.

The hygiene hypothesis implies that modern-day medical technology and sanitary standards, such as vaccines, antibiotics, purified water, and refrigeration have caused autoimmune disease by disturbing the body’s natural balance of healthy parasitic worms.

Worm therapy was part of standard medicine in previous centuries.  So it comes as no surprise to supporters of the hygiene hypothesis that autoimmune diseases were nonexistent in earlier times, arriving on the medical scene only in recent years.

According to Dr. Joel Weinstock, chief of gastroenterology and professor of immunology at Tufts University, instances of IBD went up from 1 out of 10,000 in the 50s, to 1 out of 250 in modern days.

Read more about Crohn’s disease here- Crohn’s- 9 Irritable Bowel Disease (IBD) Myths to Ignore

PARASITIC WORMS FOR CROHN’S DISEASE- FRIENDLY GUT BUGS, WWW.B12PATCH.COM

Open up and say…well, you might want to close your eyes.

Beginning in October 2011, research participants will volunteer to swallow pig whipworm eggs, as part of a study focusing on treating autoimmune disease. By introducing worms into the digestive systems, scientists hope to find a cure for digestive disorders.  By the end of the year, the whipworm larvae will have passed through the intestines, and scientists hope to find enough evidence to further the advancement of worm therapy for immunological diseases.

PARASITIC WORMS FOR CROHN’S DISEASE- FRIENDLY GUT BUGS, WWW.B12PATCH.COM

In the meantime, swallow this…

Gut Bugs:Winning the Bacteria Battle

Gastrointestinal Surgery for Crohn’s (IBD) and B12 Warnings

Ten Foods to avoid if you have Inflammatory Bowel Disorder

5 Ways to Prevent Diverticulosis-Diverticulitis Gastro Illness

Sources:

Worming Your Way to Better Health- Science News

Parasitic Worms: A Retro Cure for Autoimmune Diseases? Fox News

Worm treatment: Worm treatment trials underway for autoimmune diseases – OrlandoSentinel.com

Hygiene Hypothesis

Images:

kate*’s photostream, lilli2de, Shelly and Roy, Arlington County

12 Fermented Foods that are Good for your Gut- Probiotics

Friday, July 22nd, 2011

 

 

Treat IBD naturally and deliciously by including these anti-inflammatory fermented foods in your diet.

12 FERMENTED FOODS THAT ARE GOOD FOR YOUR GUT- PROBIOTICS, WWW.B12PATCH.COM

There’s a war brewing in your tummy!

Whether you suffer from IBS (irritable bowel syndrome) or IBD (inflammatory bowel disease), such as Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis, you know that the best way to treat your tummy right is by following a diet rich in probiotic foods.

Probiotics are live microorganisms that occur naturally in aged foods, such as pickles and yogurt.  Consider them your allies in fighting your body’s war between good and evil! (bacteria-wise, that is.)

When it comes to promoting gastrointestinal integrity, the health benefits of probiotics are unrivaled.

Gut Bugs:Winning the Bacteria Battle

12 Great  probiotics

1- Yogurt

Yogurt is an old standby for people who understand the health benefits of probiotic foods, and for good reason.

Many brands of yogurt contain live cultures that keep your tummy calm and balanced, even after taking antibiotics.

Keep in mind that not all yogurts are alike- only the ones that are marked “active cultures” or “live cultures” on the label have potent probiotics.

12 FERMENTED FOODS THAT ARE GOOD FOR YOUR GUT- PROBIOTICS, WWW.B12PATCH.COM

2- Kefir

Kefir is a popular European drink that contains a mixture of goat milk and fermented kefir grains.  In addition to antioxidants, kefir is also rich in lactobacilli and bifidus bacteria.

3- Buttermilk

Buttermilk is a nourishing drink that adds creaminess and rich flavor to Ranch salad dressings, pancakes, and cornbread.  It is also an excellent source of probiotic cultures.

Natural Treatments for the Symptoms of Crohn’s Disease

4- Sour cream

Sour cream is a fermented condiment that contains healthy bacteria.  Use it sparingly, as it is high in fat.

5- Miso

Miso is a traditional Japanese condiment that consists of a fermented paste produced by soybeans, barley, or rice.  It adds a salty, smoky flavor to soups and sauces.

6- Tempeh

Tempeh is an excellent vegetarian source of vitamin B12.  Produced from fermented soybeans, tempeh is a meatier alternative to tofu and makes a satisfying centerpiece in vegan main meals.

12 FERMENTED FOODS THAT ARE GOOD FOR YOUR GUT- PROBIOTICS, WWW.B12PATCH.COM

7- Natto

Natto is another soy product featured in Japanese cuisine, containing bacillus subtilis.  It has a pungent quality that true lovers of vegetarian cookery enjoy.

8- Sauerkraut

This fermented cabbage began its gastronomical career as a popular German condiment; today, hot dog enthusiasts all over the USA delight in topping their frankfurters with tangy sauerkraut.

The 20 Do’s and Don’ts of the GERD Diet

9- Kimchi

Kimchi is a traditional Korean condiment made of assorted pickled vegetables.  Like sauerkraut, kimchi contains fermented cabbage, in addition to onions, carrots, and garlic.

Unlike sauerkraut, kimchi has a hot ‘n spicy kick to it.

10- Kombucha tea

Kombucha tea, a health food staple that contains live cultures, is an ancient tonic that promotes healthy gut bacteria.

11- Pickles

Dill pickles, bread and butter pickles, or half-sours: any way you slice them, pickled cucumbers are a tasty, crunchy source of gut-friendly probiotics.

12- Unpasteurized olives

Naturally fermented, unpasteurized olives have a unique, full-bodied flavor that is lacking in traditionally bottled pasteurized olives.  Like all olives, they are equally beneficial for heart health.

12 FERMENTED FOODS THAT ARE GOOD FOR YOUR GUT- PROBIOTICS, WWW.B12PATCH.COM

Related Reading:

15 Steps to Better Digestion

Crohn’s Disease Suggested Dinner Menu, plus Recipes

Ten Foods to avoid if you have Inflammatory Bowel Disorder

101 Helpful Sites for Kids ‘n Teens with Crohn’s (and their Parents)

On the Run with Crohn’s? 6 Ways to Ease Public Restroom Anxiety

Sources:

Top 10 Probiotic Foods to Add to Your Diet

Top Probiotic Foods You Are Not Eating | The Conscious Life

The Best Probiotic Foods | LIVESTRONG.COM

13 Natural Probiotic Food Sources

101 Helpful Sites for Kids ‘n Teens with Crohn’s (and their Parents)

Tuesday, June 14th, 2011

 

 

Looking for advice on parenting children with Crohn’s disease? Here are some great blogs, forums and recipe sites for IBD sufferers.

101 HELPFUL SITES FOR KIDS 'N TEENS WITH CROHN'S (AND THEIR PARENTS), WWW.B12PATCH.COM

Crohn’s Disease is an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that causes inflammation in your digestive system.  Symptoms of Crohn’s disease are painful, embarrassing and sometimes life-threatening:

  • Severe stomach cramps
  • Chronic watery diarrhea
  • Bloody stools
  • Ulcer
  • Loss of appetite
  • Fever
  • Arthritis
  • Fatigue
  • Delayed growth
  • Vitamin B12 deficiency

Crohn’s Disease: What You Can Do about it Now

One of the best ways to treat IBD is to follow a diet plan that alleviates most of the symptoms. There are many food ingredients that are associated with increased Crohn’s disease symptoms: dairy, gluten, sugar, and grains, for example.

The gluten-free diet excludes all food items that contain gluten, a protein found in grains such as wheat, barley, rye, oats and others.

The casein-free diet eliminates the specific protein that occurs naturally in milk, while the dairy-free diet rules out all dairy products as a whole.

The  Specific Carbohydrate Diet eliminates certain carbohydrates and encourages eating more meat, nuts, eggs, and vegetables. The Gut and Psychology Syndrome (GAPS) diet involves reducing complex carbohydrates, processed foods, gluten, and sugar.

6 Great Diets for Autistic Children

Below is a list of 101 helpful sites and blogs for adults, teens and children with Crohn’s disease and colitis.

Casein-Free CF

Dairy-Free  DF

Gluten-Free  GF

Gut and Psychology Syndrome GAP

Specific Carbohydrate Diet SCD

Sugar-Free  SF


  1. Adventures of a Gluten Free Mom GF
  2. Avoiding Milk Protein CF
  3. Beths Blog SCD
  4. Breaking the Vicious Cycle SCD
  5. The Bright Side of Crohn’s
  6. Building a Crohn’s Community
  7. CCFA of America
  8. CDSN – The Crohn’s Disease Support Network
  9. Children’s Digestive Health and Nutrition Foundation (CDHNF)
  10. A Chronic Dose
  11. THE CHRONICLES OF CRAP
  12. The Colitis Experience
  13. ComfyTummy SCD
  14. Cooking for Celiacs, Colitis, Crohn’s and IBS
  15. Crohn’s and Colitis UK
  16. Crohn’s Boy
  17. Crohn’s/Colitis Foundation of Canada
  18. Crohns Disease and my Experience
  19. Crohn’s Disease Center (WebMD)
  20. Crohns Disease Forum
  21. Crohn’s disease: Lifestyle and home remedies (MayoClinic)
  22. Crohn’s Disease/Ulcerative Colitis Mommies Baby Center
  23. Crohn’s/IBD News
  24. Crohn’s Lives With Me
  25. Crohn’s Mommy
  26. Crohn’s On Campus — A Survival Guide For The College Student With Crohn’s Disease
  27. Dairy Free Betty DF
  28. Dairy Free “Tried and True” DF
  29. The Dietary Adventures of Jilluck SCD
  30. The Digestion Blog
  31. Eat Wheat-Free, Dairy-Free, & Low Sugar DF-GF
  32. Elana’s Pantry GF
  33. Engaged: A Blog on the Bog
  34. Farty Girl
  35. A Foodie’s Fall from Grace SCD
  36. GAPS Diet GAP
  37. GAPS Guide GAP
  38. Get Your Guts In Gear
  39. The Gimpy Colon
  40. Gluten-free girl GF
  41. Gluten Free Global Community GF
  42. Gluten-Free Goddess GF
  43. The Gluten-Free Homemaker GF
  44. Grain-Free Foodies GAP
  45. The Gutsy Girl
  46. Heal-Balance-Live SCD
  47. Healingwell.com’s Crohn’s Page
  48. How we can’t eat anything
  49. IBD and Me Activity Book (PDF)
  50. IBD in Our Home
  51. IBD U – A site for older teens with IBD transitioning into college, work and adult healthcare
  52. I Hate IBD
  53. I Have UC – Ulcerative Colitis Community
  54. In Sickness and In Health
  55. Intense Intestines Blog
  56. The Intestinal Disease Education and Awareness Society (IDEAS)
  57. Irritable Bowel Blog
  58. Jpouch Life: Stories of Colitis, Crohn’s, IBD, Ostomy, Ileostomy & J-Pouch Surgery from around the world
  59. Jenni’s Guts
  60. Journey Through Crohn’s
  61. Kat’s Food Blog SCD
  62. Kickin’ It with Crohn’s Disease
  63. Kid Appeal
  64. Know Your Gut
  65. Let’s Talk Crohn’s and other GI Issues (Facebook)
  66. LEXIE’S KITCHEN CF-GF
  67. A Life of Sugar and Spice GF
  68. A Life Without Ice Cream DF
  69. Living with Chronic Illness
  70. Living with Crohn’s Disease
  71. Miss Dropsie DF-GF
  72. Mrs Ed’s Research and Recipes SCD
  73. My Crohn’s and Colitis Blog
  74. My Crohn’s Disease
  75. MyIBD.org
  76. No more Crohn’s for me! SCD
  77. Organically Autoimmune
  78. PARA: Scientific Facts About Mycobacterium Paratuberculosis and Crohn’s Disease
  79. Partnership to Fight Chronic Disease
  80. Pecanbread web site SCD
  81. The Perfect Health Diet
  82. Pete Learns All About Crohns & Colitis Comic Book (PDF)
  83. Ramble On SCD
  84. Recipes for the Specific Carbohydrate Diet SCD
  85. The SCD Girl SCD
  86. SCD Lifestyle SCD
  87. A Second life-Living with Crohn’s Disease
  88. Semi Colon
  89. Shaky Crohny Guy
  90. She Let Them Eat Cake GF
  91. So they say I have Crohn’s
  92. The Spunky Coconut CF-GF-SF
  93. Straight Into Bed Cakefree and Dried
  94. Stronger than Crohn’s
  95. Teens With Crohn’s Disease Website
  96. UC and Crohn’s: A Site for Teens
  97. The UK Lactose Intolerance Page DF
  98. U.S. Food Safety Blog
  99. Undercoverostomy
  100. WANTED: Crohn’s End
  101. Z’s Cup Of Tea GF-SCD

Also read:

On the Run with Crohn’s? 6 Ways to Ease Public Restroom Anxiety

Natural Treatments for the Symptoms of Crohn’s Disease

Gut Bugs:Winning the Bacteria Battle

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