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Posts Tagged ‘fibromyalgia and vitamin b12 deficiency’

I have Fibromyalgia…Which Supplements should I take?

Thursday, February 16th, 2012



Fibromyalgia is an autoimmune disorder that causes chronic pain, fatigue, and gastrointestinal problems.  People with fibromyalgia symptoms experience excruciating muscular soreness in the absence of visible inflammation.  In addition to taking prescribed medications for fibromyalgia, you should also include natural supplements for optimal health.

I have Fibromyalgia…Which Supplements should I take?

Vitamin B1 (Thiamin)

If your body had a battery, Vitamin B1 would be the juice that keeps you ticking.  Vitamin B1 helps your body manufacture adenosine triphosphate, or ATP, an essential molecule that gives your body the energy it needs to keep your heart pumping and your lungs breathing.

Dose: For fibromyalgia, Crohn’s disease and folate deficiency, take at least 200 mg of thiamin per day for optimum health.

Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin)

Vitamin B12 is a water-soluble vitamin that is only found in protein foods like meat, poultry, fish, eggs, and cheese.  Your body needs vitamin B12 for red blood cell circulation, nervous system maintenance, DNA synthesis, healthy cognitive functioning, and energy production.

If you have fibromyalgia, then you need to watch for vitamin B12 deficiency, since gastrointestinal disorder symptoms like diarrhea and vomiting that are common with fibromyalgia, and can interfere with vitamin B12 absorption.

Symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency are constant fatigue, depression, confused thinking, painful tingling-numbness in the hands and feet, sleeplessness, frequent clumsiness and stumbling, and sore, burning tongue.

Dose: For fibromyalgia and vitamin B12 deficiency, 1000 mcg of non-dietary vitamin B12 supplements per week provide optimal health.

Also read:


Like vitamin B1, magnesium is another nutrient that helps your body produce ATP for energy.  Magnesium aids in muscle relaxation and keeps calcium from entering the blood supply.

Magnesium is highly recommended to relax muscular tension in people with fibromyalgia, migraine headaches, and PMS.

Dose: Take 600 mg daily for optimum health.

Vitamin D3 (Cholecalciferol)

Your body needs two forms of vitamin D to survive- Vitamin D2, which is manufactured by plants, and vitamin D3, which your skin produces upon exposure to sunlight.  Vitamin D aids in calcium absorption for building strong healthy bones and retaining bone mass.

Dose: For fibromyalgia and other autoimmune diseases, take 1,000 IU per day for optimum health.

Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)

DHA occurs naturally in fatty fish, and is essential for healthy brain development in infants and cognitive functioning in adults. DHA is also used successfully to life the mood and increase mental clarity in people who suffer “brain fog,” as evidenced by this study on Health benefits of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA).

Dose: For fibromyalgia, depression, rheumatoid arthritis, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), take 900 mg per day for optimum health.


D-ribose is a sugar that your body produces.  For people who suffer from fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue, taking extra D-ribose supplementation is helpful for boosting energy and building strong muscles.  D-ribose is also taken for improving endurance levels for sports and for muscular flexibility after strenuous workouts or with symptoms of fibromyalgia.  Additionally, D-ribose increases muscular strength for people with heart disease.

Dose: For fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome and coronary artery disease, take 500 mg three times per day for optimum health.

S-Adenosylmethionine (SAMe)

Pronounces samm-ee, SAMe is a compound that your body produces for various essential functions, including maintaining your immune system and accessing important brain chemicals like serotonin, melatonin, and dopamine.  If you suffer from vitamin B12 deficiency, folate deficiency or methionine deficiency, than your SAMe levels are probably low.

SAMe is healthful for people suffering from fibromyalgia symptoms such as muscular pain, chronic fatigue, and depression, according to many studies, including this double-blind study on oral S-adenosylmethionine in primary fibromyalgia.

Dose: For fibromyalgia, vitamin B12 deficiency and chronic fatigue, take 800 mg per day for optimum health.

5-Hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP)

5-HTP is a chemical that your body produces from tryptophan, which is then converted into serotonin, which your brain uses throughout the day to transmit messages within the nervous system.

5-HTP is useful for promoting good health in people with chronic depression, anxiety, sleep disorders, obesity, migraine headaches, and chronic pain associated with fibromyalgia, as evidenced by this double-blind study.

Dose: For depression and fibromyalgia pain, take between 100 to 300 mg three times daily for optimum health.

Vitamin E

Vitamin E is a powerful antioxidant that destroys free radicals.  Vitamin E is recommended for heart health.  Other studies suggest that vitamin E supplementation might be helpful for people with restless legs syndrome, immune disorder, and chronic pain associated with rheumatoid arthritis, peripheral neuropathy, and fibromyalgia.

Dose: For fibromyalgia, take between 50 IU and 800 IU daily for optimum health.

Capsaicin (Cayenne)

Capsaicin is a natural muscle relaxant that occurs naturally in many pepper varieties, but most abundantly in cayenne pepper. Capsaicin cream is used by people with chronic pain from shingles, fibromyalgia, peripheral neuropathy, and back pain.

Dose: When desired, you may apply liberal amounts of capsaicin cream.


Melatonin is a natural hormone produced by the pineal gland that promotes restful sleep. Melatonin supplements are helpful for people who don’t produce enough melatonin at nighttime and suffer from sleep disorders as a result. If fibromyalgia pain is keeping you up nights and causing insomnia, taking 3 mg of melatonin ½ hour before bedtime might help you get back to a normal sleep schedule, according to this report on melatonin in patients with fibromyalgia.

Please tell us…

Do you suffer from fibromyalgia?  Have you had your vitamin B12 levels tested?  Do you currently take any natural supplements for fibromyalgia that are not listed here?  We welcome your comments!

Spread the love…

Please share this article with your friends, family, or anybody you care about!

Read more about fibromyalgia and vitamin B12 deficiency:

9 Conditions that Mimic Fibromyalgia and Vitamin B12 Deficiency

Tired of being Tired all the Time…It’s Tiring!

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Fibromyalgia- Is there a Difference?


The effect of melatonin in patients with fibromyalgia: a pilot study.

Health benefits of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)- PubMed, NCBI

Oral S-adenosylmethionine in primary fibromyalgia. Double-blind clinical evaluation- PubMed, NCBI

Double-blind study of 5-hydroxytryptophan versus placebo in the treatment of primary fibromyalgia syndrome- PubMed, NCBI


9 Conditions that Mimic Fibromyalgia and Vitamin B12 Deficiency

Tuesday, January 17th, 2012



Chronic pain symptoms may indicate fibromyalgia, or one of many other illnesses like pernicious anemia from vitamin B12 deficiency.  If you constantly feel tired, bloated, nauseous, itchy, and wracked with crushing pain, you might be suffering from chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia, B12 deficiency, or all of the above…


Fibromyalgia, or fibromyositis, is a condition that causes the sufferer indescribable pain and fatigue for no apparent reason. Doctors are unsure as to the exact cause of fibromyalgia, which is classified as an autoimmune disorder involving the brain’s overreaction to pain stimuli.

Symptoms of fibromyalgia include:

  • Persistent muscular pain in at least 11 of 18 specific “pain points” on the body, including the neck and shoulders
  • Pain described as stiffness, burning, throbbing
  • Pain spreads from one tender spot to another
  • Sleep problems caused by pain and restless legs syndrome
  • Depression
  • Gastrointestinal woes, like stomach pain, nausea, flatulence, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), diarrhea, and constipation
  • Bladder incontinence
  • Dizziness
  • Cognitive difficulties, “brain fog,” trouble concentrating
  • Headaches
  • Painful tingling sensations (“pins and needles”) and numbness in hands, feet, and ankles

Also read: How to Tell if Chronic Pain is Fibromyalgia: 18 Pressure Points


Pernicious anemia- Vitamin B12 deficiency

Pernicious anemia is an autoimmune disorder that prevents your body from producing intrinsic factor, a protein the body needs for vitamin B12 absorption.  As a result, pernicious anemia patients often have dangerously low levels of vitamin B12- a nutrient involved in producing red blood cells, protecting the nervous system, lowering homocysteine levels, maintaining healthy cognitive skills, and establishing DNA synthesis.  Vitamin B12 deficiency often overlaps with fibromyalgia, as gastrointestinal issues often inhibit vitamin B12 absorption.

Symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency include:

  • Chronic fatigue
  • Depression
  • Memory loss
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • “Brain fog”
  • Anxiety
  • Aggressiveness
  • Hallucinations
  • Sleep problems
  • Shortness of breath
  • Painful tingling and numbness in hands, feet, and ankles
  • Sore tongue that is red and swollen
  • Burning sensation in mouth and tongue
  • Altered sense of taste
  • Blurred vision
  • Frequent clumsiness
  • Difficulty walking without stumbling
  • Difficulty balancing on one leg

Also read: 


Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS)

Chronic fatigue syndrome shares comorbidity with fibromyalgia. Like fibromyalgia, the cause for CFS is still unexplained.  Patients complaining of chronic fatigue receive diagnosis based on their symptoms.

Symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome include:

  • Persistent tiredness that is not caused by physical exertion, loss of sleep, or mental exhaustion
  • Waking up fatigued, despite sleeping the whole night
  • Pain in tender spots similar to the pain zones suffered by fibromyalgia patients, only less severe

Also read: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Fibromyalgia- Is there a Difference?

Myofascial pain syndrome

Myofascial pain is similar to fibromyalgia.  While fibromyalgia patients experience soreness in “pain points,” sufferers of myofascial pain syndrome experience pain in “trigger points.”  Also unlike fibromyalgia symptoms, myofascial pain does not spread from one point to another.

Symptoms of myofascial pain syndrome include:

  • Small pain points that occur in tense muscles
  • Trigger points that produce a muscular twitch when stimulated
  • Pain points are tiny lumps about the size of your pinky’s fingernail.

Chronic headaches

Fibromyalgia sufferers often experience chronic headaches such as migraines, tension headaches, daily persistent headaches, or hemicrania continua.  Scientists speculate that migraines happen in the same part of the brain as fibromyalgia triggers.

Symptoms of migraine headaches include:

  • Throbbing head pain, typically on one side of the head
  • Eye pain
  • Migraine aura- visual disturbances, vertigo, hallucinations, speech slurring, loss of consciousness, or temporary paralysis
  • Increased sensitivity to lights, sounds, and scents
  • Nausea
  • Uncontrolled vomiting
  • Stomach cramps
  • Diarrhea
  • Dizziness

Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS)

Exposure to chemicals may cause symptoms that mimic fibromyalgia, although researchers are uncertain if MCS is a physical response or a psychological reaction.

Symptoms of multiple chemical sensitivity include:

  • Significantly lower threshold for chemical tolerance than normal
  • Pain reaction consistent with various unrelated chemicals
  • Sensitivity occurs in more than one organ of the body
  • Chronic pain reaction that occurs repeatedly from exposure to certain chemicals
  • Removing the chemical trigger ends pain symptoms


Most fibromyalgia patients have experienced clinical depression in the past, and a substantial (but lower) percentage suffers from chronic depression. Depression is also a common symptom of vitamin B12 deficiency.  If depression stems from fibromyalgia pain, then it does not classify as major depression, but rather a secondary condition of fibromyalgia chronic pain syndrome.

Symptoms of major depression include:

  • Spells of sadness that last for months
  • Daily depression
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Difficulty making decisions
  • Agitation
  • Anxiety
  • Sleep problems like oversleeping or not sleeping enough
  • Fatigue
  • Feelings of low value or guilt
  • Weight problems, either excessive weight gain or weight loss
  • Contemplations of suicide

Also read: Vitamin Deficiencies can drive you Crazy- Seriously!  Part 1


Hypothyroidism (Hashimoto’s disease) is sometimes confused with fatigue associated with fibromyalgia or vitamin B12 deficiency anemia.  As opposed to hyperthyroid disorder, where the thyroid gland produces too many hormones, hypothyroid disorder involves underproduction of hormones in the thyroid gland.

Symptoms of hypothyroidism include:

  • Joint or muscle pain that hurts “all over”
  • Cold hypersensitivity
  • Depression
  • Fatigue
  • Constipation
  • Weight gain
  • Altered sense of taste
  • Dry thick skin patches

Also read: Low B12 means Low Thyroid- Hypothyroidism and B12 Deficiency


Autoimmune disease symptoms like lupus may occur at the same time as fibromyalgia or B12 deficiency, making it harder to diagnose. Conversely, patients with lupus often don’t realize that their vitamin B12 levels have dropped to a dangerous low until they start to suffer severe nerve damage.

Symptoms of lupus include:

  • Fatigue
  • Fever
  • Skin lesions
  • Joint pain
  • Shortness of breath
  • Headaches
  • Memory loss
  • “brain fog”
  • Confusion
  • Dry eyes

Also read: Lupus and Vitamin B12 Deficiency- What’s the Connection?

Lyme disease

Lyme disease is a bacterial infection spread by ticks.  Because of delayed symptoms mimicking fibromyalgia, about 15-50% of fibromyalgia patients receives a misdiagnosis of Lyme disease, and is instructed to take strong antibiotics. A blood test sometimes excludes Lyme disease, but not always.

Symptoms of Lyme disease include:

  • Itching all over the body
  • Chills and fever
  • Headaches
  • Dizziness
  • Muscular pain
  • Stiff neck
  • Numbness and tingling
  • Partial paralysis
  • Speech problems

Restless Legs Syndrome

A significant amount of fibromyalgia sufferers and pernicious anemia patients also experience restless legs syndrome at night. However, other causes of restless legs syndrome are kidney disorder, diabetes, Parkinson’s disease, or drugs.

Symptoms of restless legs syndrome include:

  • Uneasy feeling in lower leg
  • Creeping, crawling sensations
  • Intense need to shake leg in order to ease symptoms
  • Achiness that disappears with exercise

Read more about diseases that mimic fibromyalgia and vitamin B12 deficiency

Vitamin B12 Deficiency and Movement Disorders- How They Relate

Sore Burning Tongue, Dry Mouth, and Weird Tastes- What’s the Cause?

Type 2 Diabetes and Vitamin B12 Deficiency- Are you at Risk?


Fibromyalgia- University of Maryland Medical Center

Mayo Clinic

PubMed Health

Images, from top:

jcantrootKindreds Page, aussiegall

Chronically Fatigued? Fake yourself Awake in 7 Steps

Friday, July 8th, 2011



Some mornings, you wake up feeling wired, achy, and sleep deprived, especially if you suffer from chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) or fibromyalgia. Here are some beauty tips to give you wide-awake eyes before that first cup of coffee…


CFS and fibromyalgia can make you feel lethargic and achy all day…sometimes, chronic pain wakes you up even before your alarm clock.

On those days, it helps to make yourself look refreshed and well rested on the outside, even if your body is telling you to crawl back under the covers.  A few simple beauty techniques are all it takes to revive tired eyes, even your skin tone, and get your sparkle on!  Who knows- you might even feel more roused and ready by the time you’re finished!


Suffering from Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue? B12 to the Rescue!

Try these 7 makeup tricks and treatments, and you’ll be on your toes and out the door in a flash:

#1- Chill out. According to the Mayo Clinic, nothing revives tired eyes as well as a cold compress.  As soon as you get out of bed, splash some icy cold water on your face.  Next, take a bag of frozen peas out of the freezer; wrap it in a small towel and press gently, alternating between eyes.  On the go?  Keep a package of Spenco 2nd Skin Moist Burn Pads handy for a quick fresher-upper.


#2- Get your caffeine fix. Only not from coffee or energy drinks, which will just make you crash and burn later.  Caffeine is a natural diuretic, so it’s only natural that some of the best under-eye treatments use caffeine to combat puffy, watery eyes.  Some good ones to try are Murad Moisture Silk Eye Gel ($49.00), or First Aid Beauty Detox Eye Roller ($24.00).

#3- Now add milk. The lactic acid in milk brightens your complexion by reducing under eye puffiness and lightening dark circles.  Pour yourself a cup of milk on ice.  Now, grab a face cloth, dip it into the milk, and wring it out gently.  Apply the icy “milk bath” to your face.  Repeat.


#4- Ditch the mask. Instead of applying a thick layer of foundation, opt for a light tinted moisturizer.  There’s no need to rush out to the makeup counter; save a few pennies by making your own custom makeup cream!  Just mix a few dabs of liquid foundation with an equal amount of SPF 30+ face cream.  The sunblock will protect you from getting dark spots, and the lotion will alleviate dry flaky skin.


100 Best Sites for Fibromyalgia or Chronic Fatigue Information

#5- Lighten up. A few strategically placed dabs of shimmery highlighter on the lids will give you that wide-eyed look you’re after.  Just remember to keep it minimal- too much shine can magnify fine lines, rather than hide them.  When choosing blush, pick out a natural peachy shade, and avoid dark contrasting color, which can give a haggard, tired look.


#6- Do some curls and stretches. If nothing else, take care of your lashes.  Long, bouncy eyelashes are the best way to sharpen your look and give you a youthful, fresh appearance.  First, curl with an eyelash curler, keeping it as close to the lash line as possible, and holding for 10-15 seconds.  Repeat.  Follow up with a brownish-black shade of waterproof mascara to the upper lashes only.

#7- Get the grease out. Too exhausted to think about shampooing your hair?  Oily, flat hair tells the world that you’re tired, and makes you feel tired, to boot.  Go to Walgreens and pick up a can of Tresemme Fresh Start Dry Shampoo ($4.99) – it contains oil-absorbing powder to draw out grimy dirt and perspiration, and leave your hair smelling fresh.  Alternatively, you can visit Drugstore.com to order a bottle of Klorane Gentle Dry Shampoo with Oat Milk Non-Aerosol Spray ($18.00).  Dry shampoo is also an excellent hair-cleansing treatment for bedridden patients.

Also read:

Staying Fit with Fibromyalgia: 13 Pain-Free Workouts

7 Reasons You Have Brain Fog…And What to do About It


Dark circles under eyes: When to see a doctor – MayoClinic.com

5 Steps to Wide-Awake Eyes

Six Easy Ways to Look Younger, Less Tired and More Vibrant!

10 Ways to Fake 8 Hours of Sleep

Milk Nutrients and Health Benefits

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