B12 Patch B12 Patch
B12 Patch
B12 Patch
B12 Patch   B12 Patch
B12 Patch Product Information B12 Patch About Vitamin B12 B12 Patch Research B12 Patch FAQ B12 Patch Reviews B12 Patch Blog B12 Patch Contact Us B12 Patch Order B12 Patch


Posts Tagged ‘Gastric bypass surgery’

What Causes Pernicious Anemia?

Thursday, October 10th, 2013



There are many causes of pernicious anemia, including autoimmune conditions, medications, and damage to the intestines. Vitamin B12 deficiency caused by vegan dieting is not considered a cause of pernicious anemia, as it can be reversed by eating foods containing ample amounts of vitamin B12.

What Causes Pernicious Anemia?

Digestive illnesses

Crohn’s disease, celiac, and fibromyalgia can impair your ability to produce intrinsic factor, a digestive enzyme that is needed in order to extract vitamin B12 from food and replenish supplies of vitamin B12 in the blood stream. Pernicious anemia is often comorbid with illnesses that affect the gastrointestinal system. For prevention, check vitamin B12 levels routinely and supplement with non-pill forms of vitamin B12.

Shocking Must-See Video on Vitamin B12 Deficiency Crisis


If either of your parents or grandparents suffered from pernicious anemia, then you are also a high risk category for vitamin B12 deficiency. With frequent testing, you can catch the onset of vitamin B12 deficiency before it advances to pernicious anemia.

Pernicious Anemia- What’s your Risk?

Medication-induced vitamin B12 deficiency

Certain medications can eventually impair your ability to absorb vitamin B12, leading to pernicious anemia; these include PPIs used to treat GERD (acid reflux), metformin for diabetes, and various antibiotics, NSAIDs and antidepressants. If you are on long-term medication, check to see if you are a risk factor for megaloblastic anemia and use vitamin B12 supplements.

25 Medications that Cause Vitamin B12 Deficiency

Gastrointestinal surgery

If you have had bariatric surgery (gastric bypass) or surgical treatments for illnesses such as Crohn’s disease, then pernicious anemia may result because of vitamin B12 malabsorption. To prevent vitamin B12 deficiency, supplement with non-oral forms of vitamin B12.

Please tell us…

Do you get enough vitamin B12 to prevent symptoms of pernicious anemia, or would you feel better if your doctor would prescribe more vitamin B12?

Do you have any questions or suggestions?  Please leave your comments below.

Share with your friends!

If you found this article helpful, then please share with your friends, family, and coworkers by email, twitter, or Facebook.

Like this? Read more:

Is Pernicious Anemia Megaloblastic?

Vitamin B12 Deficiency and Bariatric Surgery

What are the Symptoms of Pernicious Anemia- B12 deficiency?

Image courtesy of keepingtime_ca/flickr

Vitamin B12 Deficiency and Bariatric Surgery

Wednesday, September 11th, 2013



According to health reports, vitamin B12 deficiency in bariatric surgery patients is on the rise. But before you commit to bariatric surgery, you need to know how it will affect your body’s absorption of necessary vitamins and minerals, especially vitamin B12 (cobalamin). In some cases, vitamin B12 deficiency can be just as debilitating as morbid obesity.

Vitamin B12 Deficiency and Bariatric Surgery

Vitamin B12 deficiency after Bariatric Surgery Weight Loss

Vitamin B12 Deficiency

If you’ve been struggling to lose weight for most of your life, then you may be considering a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass procedure. Before you go under the knife, you should know the health risks involved with bariatric surgery; vitamin B12 deficiency is one of the most common deficiencies observed after weight loss surgery. Bariatric patients are at an increased risk of developing vitamin B12 deficiency because their digestive tracts have been altered in such a way as to interfere with the natural absorption of this crucial vitamin.

Signs of severe vitamin B12 deficiency include depression, memory loss, chronic fatigue, brain fog, anxiety, and musculoskeletal disorders. (Read this: Vitamin Deficiency symptoms List)

Vitamin B12 is needed for healthy red blood cells and cognitive excellence, plus it protects the nerve cells from harm. So when vitamin B12 levels plummet, as they often do a few years post-bariatric surgery, patients begin to suffer symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency that affect memory, mental health, and nervous system integrity.

Bariatric Surgery Causes Malabsorption

In healthy adults, vitamin B12 is broken down in the acidic environment of the stomach.  Intrinsic factor, which is released by the parietal cells in the stomach, then binds with vitamin B12 in the duodenum. The bound vitamin B12 is then absorbed in the ileum.

During gastric bypass surgery, however, the portions of the gastrointestinal tract responsible for making intrinsic factor, most of the stomach and duodenum, are bypassed, limiting the breakdown of vitamin B12 and its subsequent binding with intrinsic factor, causing vitamin B12 malabsorption, or the inability to digest vitamin B12 naturally from foods or even pill form.

You cannot absorb enough vitamin B12 to prevent severe vitamin B12 deficiency.

Without the right type of  supplementation, your vitamin B12 levels will slowly decline, along with your health.

Gastric Bypass Side Effects your Surgeon Forgot to Mention

Which kind of B12 is best?

For patients of bariatric surgery, only very miniscule amounts of vitamin B12 are absorbed through the digestive tract; this true for vitamin B12 food sources and vitamin B12 in a pill form. It doesn’t matter if you swallow a vitamin B12 pill whole or get your vitamin B12 in chewable or liquid form; once you’ve had bariatric surgery, vitamin B12 if ingested via the digestive tract will not be absorbed into the body.

To prevent severe vitamin B12 deficiency in patients of gastric bypass or other bariatric surgery, vitamin B12 supplements that deposit B12 molecules directly into the bloodstream are the only real option. There are several non-oral methods of supplying vitamin B12 that are available by prescription or over the counter.

How much vitamin B12 should I take?

Most vitamin B12 supplements are 1,000mcg. Your doctor may recommend weekly, biweekly, or monthly doses of vitamin B12.

For optimum results in preventing vitamin B12 deficiency, bariatric surgery patients may take as much vitamin B12 as they need to prevent debilitating symptoms, as there is no upper limit for vitamin B12 under FDA guidelines, so no risk of overdosing or experiencing any negative side effects.

Plus, the extra vitamin B12 may help with weight loss, as B12 boosts energy, promotes good metabolism, and sustains healthy mental balance.

Your turn!

Do you have any questions or suggestions?  Please leave your comments below.

Share with your friends!

If you found this article helpful, then please share with your friends, family, and coworkers by email, twitter, or Facebook.

Like this? Read more:

Five Fat-Burning Foods Rich in Vitamin B12

Getting your Vitamin B12, Post-Bariatric Surgery

Weight Loss Surgery: What 50 Post-Op Patients have to Say

I Eat Healthy…So How did I Get Vitamin B12 Deficiency?

Image courtesy of Ambro/freedigitalphotos

Gastric Bypass Side Effects your Surgeon Forgot to Mention

Tuesday, April 30th, 2013



Gastric bypass surgery can be a lifesaver for the obese who have difficulty losing weight, but it can also pose serious health risks, causing debilitating side effects that can eventually lead to death.

Gastric Bypass Side Effects your Surgeon Forgot to Mention

Please note: None of this information constitutes medical advice, but rather a guide to help you discuss bariatric surgery options and side effects with your doctor.

Side effects of gastric bypass

Nearly one million people have opted for bariatric surgeries as a last-resort means of losing weight to prevent heart attack, stroke, and diabetes, and most are successful.

But about 30% of patients find that they have traded one set of ailments for another, often battling several forms of anemia, such as vitamin B12 deficiency anemia, iron deficiency, and folate deficiency, in addition to illnesses such as osteoporosis and hypoglycemia.

Getting your Vitamin B12, Post-Bariatric Surgery

Additionally, about 20% of gastric bypass surgery patients require addition operations in order to treat complications that may arise, such as ulcers or fecal incontinence.

Furthermore, a large number continue to suffer from depression and anxiety related to their food addictions and mentality regarding weight. According to some studies, weight loss surgery patients are five times more likely to commit suicide than the general population.

Finally, about 20% of patients who elect for bariatric surgery ultimately gain all their weight back, and continue to suffer side effects caused by the invasive procedure.

Weight Loss Surgery: What 50 Post-Op Patients have to Say

Side effects and complications that may occur following gastric bypass may include:

  • Pernicious anemia, vitamin B12 deficiency: Removal of the ileum interferes with your ability to digest vitamin B12 naturally from foods, so unless you continue to supplement with non-dietary vitamin B12, then you are at high risk for developing symptoms such as fatigue, dizziness, depression, confusion, anxiety, mental sluggishness, poor concentration, painful numbness in the hands and feet, muscle spasms, and many other symptoms of severe vitamin B12 depletion.
  • Other types of malnutrition may also develop as a result of failure to provide daily B vitamins and other supplements. Folic acid anemia, iron deficiency anemia, low calcium, and vitamin C deficiency can cause pain, fatigue, bruising, swelling, poor healing, and frequent illnesses.
  • Osteoporosis caused by low stomach acid production and calcium depletion is a common side effect that is treated by taking calcium supplements with citric acid.
  • Ulcers may develop in the small intestine, requiring surgery.
  • Many patients experience frequent dehydration resulting from smaller stomach size.
  • Rapid weight loss may cause constant fatigue, mood swings, chronic pain, hair loss, and sensitivity to changes in temperature.
  • Noninsulinoma pancreatogenous hypoglycemia syndrome (NIPHS) can sometimes result following gastric bypass surgery, causing neurological symptoms such as seizures, and will require pancreatic surgery.
  • Gastric dumping syndrome often occurs while eating, as food moves too quickly through your body and causes stomach pain, bloating, and dizziness.
  • Many bariatric surgery patients suffer from extreme constipation, causing side effects of stomach pain, fecal incontinence, diarrhea, and intense bloating.

Your turn!

Do you have any questions or suggestions?  Please leave your comments below.

Share with your friends!

If you found this article helpful, then please share with your friends, family, and coworkers by email, twitter, or Facebook.

Like this? Read more:

10 Mistakes Gastric Bypass Patients Often Make

Gastric Bypass Surgery Better than Banding…or it it?


Bariatric Surgery: Postoperative Concerns

Long-Term Impact of Bariatric Surgery on Body Weight, Comorbidities, and Nutritional Status

Follow-up of Nutritional and Metabolic Problems After Bariatric Surgery

Image courtesy of nixxphotography/freedigitalphotos

Gastric Bypass Surgery Better than Banding…or it it?

Tuesday, January 24th, 2012



Gastric bypass surgery offers the morbidly obese a new lease on life, according to research. Recent studies confirm that people who undergo Roux-en-Y weight loss surgery lose the most weight and keep it off, more so than with gastric banding.  But while gastric surgery promises a high success rate, the risk for serious complications is significantly higher than with other kinds of bariatric surgery.


What is gastric bypass surgery?

The Roux-en-Y gastric bypass changes the size of your stomach and reroutes food past certain parts of the digestive system.  People who undergo gastric bypass surgery achieve a feeling of fullness much quicker than before the surgery, and are thus able to eat less and lose a considerable amount of weight. However, because gastric bypass is a complicated procedure, many problems may arise during or after the surgery.

  • With the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, a small egg-sized stomach sack is created and attached to the middle part of the small intestine.
  • The rest of the stomach, as well as the upper section of the small intestine, are completely avoided, or “bypassed.”
  • A common side effect of gastric bypass is gastric bypass dumping in which food travels through the stomach and empties into the small intestine too quickly, causing symptoms like diarrhea, nausea, and stomach cramps.
  • Another common side effect is nutritional deficiency, including vitamin B12 deficiency and many other vitamin, calcium, iron, and magnesium deficiencies.
  • Patients of gastric bypass surgery must supplement with extra vitamins and minerals, with a special emphasis on vitamin B12 supplements, in order to avoid vitamin B12 deficiency symptoms like nerve cell damage and memory problems.

Vitamin B12 deficiency after Bariatric Surgery Weight Loss

What is gastric banding?

Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding surgery is the second-most popular form of bariatric surgery after the gastric bypass procedure.  Banding is a good alternative for gastric bypass surgery because it is less invasive.

  • In gastric banding, the surgeon places an adjustable silicon band around the upper part of your stomach, effectively cinching it to a smaller size.
  • After banding, your stomach can hold only about 1 ounce of food at one time.
  • The gastric band is adjusted through a saline solution that may be injected through a small device under the skin.
  • Most people who undergo gastric banding lose approximately 40% of their body weight.
  • Gastric banding surgery is completely reversible.
  • The mortality rate due to gastric banding surgery is 1/2000.
  • Since the small intestine remains intact, gastric banding surgery does not disrupt your digestive system, and there is no risk of vitamin deficiency, such as vitamin B12 deficiency.


Gastric Bypass Stomach Surgery in Mexico- Would you?

Is gastric banding surgery safer than gastric bypass?

In a recent study comparing success rates between gastric bypass surgery and gastric banding, scientists had this to say:

  • About 17% of gastric bypass patients had complications like infections following surgery, compared to only 5% of gastric banding patients.
  • Six years post-surgery, 12% of gastric bypass patients were back to being morbidly obese, with a BMI over 35, while about a third of gastric banding patients were once again overweight.
  • Thirteen percent of bypass patients required a follow-up operation, while approximately 27% of gastric banding patients needed to return for more surgeries.
  • Complications involved with gastric banding include band erosion, stretched esophagus, or food-related issues.
  • Complications involved with gastric bypass can be much more severe; possibly fatal complications include bowel blockage and leakage of waste material into the body.


Anorexic British Teen Regrets Gastric Bypass Surgery

Which should I choose- banding or bypass?

With gastric bypass surgery, food rushes through the digestive system, and essential minerals and vitamins pass through without ever being absorbed into the bloodstream.  So while you feed your stomach, you are not feeding the rest of the body the nutrients that it needs to survive.  Life-long supplementation of vitamins- vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E, and B vitamins-, and minerals is a commitment that gastric bypass patients much make.

Your chances of losing weight following gastric banding are 50/50, and there is a fair chance that you will have complications that require a return trip to the operating room.  However, banding-related complications are less severe than bypass-related complications, which can be fatal.  Then again, if obesity poses a serious life risk, then you might be better off with the most successful weight loss surgery- gastric bypass.

Was this article helpful?  If so, please share with your friends…and leave us your comments.  We’d love to hear from you!

Read more about bariatric surgery here:

10 Mistakes Gastric Bypass Patients Often Make

B12 Deficiency: Don’t Ignore the Symptoms

Weight Loss Surgery: What 50 Post-Op Patients have to Say


Long term, gastric bypass beats out banding: study- Reuters

Gastric Banding Surgery for Weight Loss

Roux-En-Y Gastric Bypass

Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass vs Gastric Banding for Morbid Obesity

Images, from top:

außerirdische sind gesund, riverofgod, {eclaire}

Vitamin B12 deficiency after Bariatric Surgery Weight Loss

Tuesday, November 1st, 2011



If you’ve had bariatric surgery (gastric bypass surgery, lap band surgery), then you’re at risk for vitamin B12 deficiency. Weight loss surgery causes vitamin B12 malabsorption, in addition to difficulty absorbing other vitamins and minerals. Learn about vitamin B12 deficiency symptoms, and ways to get your B12 levels back to normal.


How many types of bariatric surgery procedures are there?

There are many types of weight loss surgeries, including gastric bypass and lap band surgery, but there are two general categories:

  • Malabsorptive surgery rearranges and/or removes part of your intestines so that you are unable to absorb vitamins from foods, thus bypassing the digestive process.  There are no longer any strictly 100% malabsorptive weight loss surgeries, but many such as the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass include a combination of (mostly) malabsorptive and restrictive techniques.
  • Restrictive surgery shrinks your stomach, thus causing you to feel full earlier and avoid overeating.  Examples are the gastric sleeve and gastric banding (lap band surgery).


Gastric Bypass Stomach Surgery in Mexico- Would you?

Why do I need to take bariatric vitamins and minerals after having bariatric surgery?

If you’ve had weight loss surgery, then you are at a high risk for vitamin deficiencies, particularly vitamin B12 deficiency.  There are two reasons for this:

If you’ve had malabsorptive surgery, such as a mini-gastric bypass or duodenal switch, then your body is unable to digest water-soluble vitamins such as vitamin B12 from food sources. 

One of the procedures of malabsorptive bariatric surgery is the removal of the ileum, the part of your small intestine responsible for digesting vitamin B12.  

The only way for you to receive enough B12 to avoid vitamin deficiency is to put it directly into your bloodstream, through vitamin B12 shots (Sublingual B12 pills are not your best option for absorbing vitamin B12.)

With restrictive surgery, such as gastric sleeve, your stomach is unable to contain enough food at one time to avoid vitamin deficiency.


10 Mistakes Gastric Bypass Patients Often Make

What are the symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency, and why should I be worried?

Vitamin B12 supports many important functions in your body- B12 boosts energy and mental clarity, aids in producing red blood cells, maintains your metabolism, protects your >nervous system, strengthens cognitive functioning, and reduces your risk of heart attack or stroke.

Vitamin deficiency is one of many possible gastric bypass complications. In one study on diminished B12 absorption after gastric bypass, 30% of gastric bypass patients suffered from B12 deficiency.

The most common symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency are:

  • Chronic fatigue
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Short-term memory loss
  • “Brain fog”
  • Disorientation
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Loss of physical balance
  • Altered taste perception
  • Tingling and/or numbing sensation in hands and feet
  • Blurred vision

Left untreated, symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency could escalate into severe neurological damage, early-onset dementia, and even premature death.


Read more about weight loss surgery and vitamin B12 deficiency:

Gastrointestinal Surgery for Crohn’s (IBD) and B12 Warnings

Bariatric Surgery- 13 Reasons you still need to Exercise

Tired of getting Dumped? 4 Ways to avoid Gastric Bypass Dumping.


Types of Bariatric Surgery – The 16 Established & Experimental Weight Loss Surgery Procedures

Evidence for diminished B12 absorption after gastric bypass: oral supplementation does not prevent low plasma B12 levels in bypass patients- PubMed NCBI

Vitamin B12 Absorption & Gastric Bypass- LIVESTRONG.COM

Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet: Vitamin B12

Image credits (from top):

kornnphoto, nattavut, alancleaver_2000, o5com

Tired of getting Dumped? 4 Ways to avoid Gastric Bypass Dumping.

Wednesday, July 6th, 2011



What is gastric bypass dumping , and how can I avoid it? If you’ve had bariatric surgery, then you need to learn how to prevent getting “dumped.”


Dumping Syndrome or “rapid gastric emptying” is what occurs after a gastric bypass surgery when the food you eat moves through your digestive system too quickly.

Swallowed bits of food are unceremoniously “dumped” through your stomach and into your small intestines without proper digestion, leading to unpleasant side effects, such as nausea.

Dumping syndrome can happen quickly, only thirty minutes after eating, but it can also occur several hours later.

Within the first hour of eating, dumping syndrome symptoms may include:

  • Diarrhea
  • Nausea
  • Lightheadedness
  • Stomach cramps
  • Fatigue
  • Belching
  • Heart palpitations

When dumping occurs about three hours after a meal, then symptoms may include:

  • Perspiring
  • Tiredness
  • Light-headedness
  • Jerkiness
  • Anxiety
  • Heart palpitations
  • Fainting
  • Muddled thinking
  • Diarrhea
  • Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)

10 Mistakes Gastric Bypass Patients Often Make

Dumping syndrome is painful and often embarrassing, with strict adherence to a few simple dietary rules, you can avoiding experiencing it in the future.

Here are four basic rules for preventing gastric bypass dumping symptoms:

1) Eat slowly.

Eating or drinking hurriedly is a certain way to cause dumping later. 

Because your body no longer has the control mechanism that regulates how quickly food enters your small intestines, it is up to you to make sure that your stomach receives food to digest at a slow, steady pace before sending it on through your gastrointestinal tract.

So eat at a leisurely pace, chew your food carefully, and take small bites.

2) Avoid simple sugars.

Certain foods, such as ice cream, cakes, and cookies (the very things that got you fat in the first place) are likely to cause the unpleasant side effects of dumping, such as dizziness, hypertension, nausea, and diarrhea

Check food labels, and avoid anything that lists sugar, glucose, or dextrose (or anything ending in –ose) as one of its first three ingredients.  

Study: Gastric Bypass as a Cure for Diabetes?

3) Sip water throughout the day, and lots of it.

Never drink liquids while eating, as that causes dumping symptoms, like nausea and vomiting.  

Always leave a no-drinking window of thirty minutes before and after eating. 

Additionally, drinking during a meal will cause you to eat less, which can lead to malnutrition.  

To avoid dehydration, remember to drink small sips of water between meals, amounting to 64 ounces per day. Don’t rush- the same rules apply for eating as they do for drinking water.

4) Eat protein with your meals.

Half of your dinner plate should include a source of protein, such as lean beef, chicken, fish, eggs or dairy.  Because it takes longer to digest protein, you’re less likely to overeat or eat too quickly. 

In addition, protein foods are high in vitamin B12, a nutrient that you should be including in your daily supplements, as well as in your regular diet.  

B12 Deficiency: Don’t Ignore the Symptoms

Related Reading:

Weight Loss Surgery: What 50 Post-Op Patients have to Say

Teens and Weight Loss Surgery: Worth the Risk?

Gastric Bypass Surgery: Good for the Heart


Gastric bypass diet- MayoClinic.com

How to Prevent Dumping Syndrome After Weight Loss Surgery | eHow.com

Gastric Dumping Diet | LIVESTRONG.COM

Dumping Syndrome: Unpleasant Gastric Bypass Side Effect. Avoid It!

Dumping Syndrome: The Dirty Secret Gastric Bypass Patients Keep

B12 Deficiency: Don’t Ignore the Symptoms

Tuesday, May 10th, 2011



Vitamin B12 deficiency can start with a few symptoms like tiredness and slight tingling or numbness in hands and feet; ignore the symptoms and low B12 levels could escalate into severe nerve damage, disease or death.


What are the symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency?

Below is a list of some of the most common side effects which may arise from insufficient stores of vitamin B12.

(Please note that the severity of the symptoms may vary according to the stage of B12 deficiency.)

  • Fatigue
  • Depression
  • Aggressive behavior
  • Hallucinations
  • Sleep problems
  • Frailness
  • Imbalance, difficulty walking with coordination
  • Numbness or tingling in the hands and/or feet
  • Altered taste perception
  • Heart palpitations
  • Short-term memory loss
  • Also read: B12 Deficiency can really Get on your Nerves

B12 and your body

Vitamin B12 is a water-soluble nutrient. Therefore, your body is only able to store it for a short time. Vitamin B12 has many important functions in your body.

  • Vitamin B12 is essential for producing plenty of healthy red blood cells and for synthesizing DNA. A lack of B12 severely reduces your body’s ability to make sufficient red blood cells for carrying oxygen throughout your body.
  • Pernicious anemia is a life-threatening condition that is often the cause of vitamin B12 deficiency.
  • Your nervous system is dependent on vitamin B12, which enhances communication between the brain and your many nerve sensors, such as those in your fingertips, feet and mouth. This explains why sufferers of B12 deficiency notice a sensation similar to wearing gloves throughout the day; others report that their food tastes unusual, another clue that the body’s neurons are not operating correctly.
  • A deficiency of vitamin B12 compromises your nervous system and could result in permanent neurological damage.
  • Researchers have found a direct link between vitamin B12 deficiency and brain atrophy among the elderly. In one study which appeared in the Journal of Nutrition, senior citizens who had the highest levels of B12 experienced healthier cognitive functioning skills.
  • Also read Now Eat This: Preventing Age Related Hearing Loss
  • Vitamin B12 helps your body monitor already healthy homocysteine levels, a factor in heart health.

What diseases are associated with B12 deficiency?

There are many illnesses which occur when B12 levels are low; some conditions may be caused by vitamin B12 deficiency, while others are closely correlated. Below are some common illnesses associated with B12 deficiency, including many which most people don’t realize are affected by vitamin B12 levels.

  • Alzheimer’s disease, brain deterioration, cognitive decline, memory loss and other forms of dementia
  • Neurological diseases such as Multiple sclerosis (MS)
  • Cardiovascular disease, caused by high homocysteine levels
  • Mental illness, including depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder and psychosis
  • Autism spectrum disorder
  • Autoimmune diseases, such as AIDS and pernicious anemia
  • Infertility

Eating Your Way Out of Depression with B-12

B12 deficiency is often misdiagnosed

According to a Tufts University study, 40 percent of people between the ages of 26 and 83 have low to medium-low B12 levels, indicating a deficiency severe enough to cause neurological disorder symptoms, while 9 percent are depleted enough to the point of irreversible neurological damage and life-threatening symptoms. Approximately 16 percent are close to becoming vitamin B12 deficient.

Why is vitamin B12 deficiency overlooked?

Only a blood test can properly determine if somebody is suffering from B12 deficiency, and most physicians don’t include a B12 screening with yearly check-ups. Also, many of the symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency are similar to common health disorders, such as diabetes, chronic depression and fatigue.

How can you get enough B12?

Vitamin B12 is found in many high protein foods. Excellent sources of B12 are:

  • Lean beef cuts, such as chuck and sirloin
  • Poultry
  • Fish, particularly salmon, tuna and halibut
  • Shellfish, including crab meat, mussels, clams and oysters
  • Dairy products, such as swiss cheese, yogurt, milk and cottage cheese
  • Eggs

Vegans are at a high risk for developing vitamin B12 deficiency, as their diet specifically excludes food items which provide vitamin B12. Other people who are at risk of getting B12 deficiency are patients of weight loss surgery, diabetics on metformin, individuals with gastrointestinal disease, people who lack intrinsic factor and anybody taking prescription heartburn medication.

The only way to prevent becoming deficient in vitamin B12 is by constantly replenishing your body with B12-rich nutrients.

Alternatively, patients diagnosed with vitamin B12 deficiency are encouraged to take vitamin B12 supplements, such as sublingual B12 tablets, B12 shots, or over-the-counter (OTC) vitamin B12.

Find more information on preventing vitamin B12 deficiency:

Getting Enough Vitamin B12? Three Reasons Why You Might Not B

On Becoming Vegan: Avoiding Vitamin B12 Deficiency and Others

Anorexic British Teen Regrets Gastric Bypass Surgery

Wednesday, May 4th, 2011



Malissa Jones, once nicknamed “Britain’s fattest teen” is now quite possibly Britain’s skinniest…and unhappiest teen, following gastric bypass surgery.


Lose weight now, she was told, or your life is at stake

At the age of 16, Ms. Jones was warned by her doctor that she would have only months to live, unless she lost weight. Morbidly obese, Malissa weighed in at 34 stone. (In American-speak, that’s 476 pounds.)  Having already had a mild heart attack a year earlier, Malissa was told to lose 280 pounds, lest the next heart attack be her last.

Her diet consisted of mainly junk food like chocolate and potato chips. At 5’8, Malissa consumed about 15,000 calories a day, more than 7 times the amount recommended for a girl of her age with her build. Malissa had all the symptoms of obesity; she suffered from angina, a cardiovascular disease normally associated with old age, at the tender age of 15. At nighttime she was forced to wear an oxygen mask, because doctors warned that her heart and lungs couldn’t withstand the force of her weight while she was lying down.

For more information about the risks involved with teen weight loss surgery, please read Teens and Weight Loss Surgery: Worth the Risk?

Doctors recommended gastric bypass surgery

In 2008, at the age of 17, Malissa Jones made headlines when she became the youngest person ever in the UK to receive gastric bypass surgery, of which the cut-off age is generally 18.  The $20,000 NHS funded operation entailed stapling her stomach to a significantly smaller size and “bypassing” her digestive system so as to limit food absorption. For this reason, gastric bypass patients are unable to digest vitamins such as B12 from food sources, and must submit to a lifetime of vitamin supplements in order to prevent severe vitamin B12 deficiency.

The surgery was a success, at least at first. Two years post surgery, Malissa had lost half her body weight, although she still carried about 28 pounds of loose, excess flabby skin, a side effect which causes quite a bit of dismay among bariatric surgery patients.

“I’m too thin. My body shocks me. But swallowing is painful.

Eating a tiny amount gives me stomach cramps or makes me sick,” admits Malissa.

At the age of 20 she became pregnant. Doctors were concerned that her newly stapled stomach might rupture from the weight of the baby’s womb; at six months Malissa suffered liver failure, so she was forced to have a Cesarean birth. Her baby boy, named Harry, died only one hour after surgery of malnutrition. During her pregnancy, and likely as a result of her weight loss surgery, she was not physically able to eat enough food to support herself and the baby. Malissa was devastated.

For more information about avoiding vitamin B12 deficiency during pregnancy, please read Pregnant Moms and Low B-12 Levels: Let ‘em Eat Steak!


Today, Malissa once again battles for her life, only now her enemy is anorexia nervosa

Now, Malissa is 21-years-old and weighs a mere 112 pounds. Diagnosed with anorexia nervosa, she admits that she has food phobia, and that eating makes her feel physically ill. Sometimes, she says, she would rather die than make herself eat. ”I’m too thin. My body shocks me. But swallowing is painful. Eating a tiny amount gives me stomach cramps or makes me sick,” admits Malissa.

Her regular daily diet consists of 3 cooked carrots, some turnips, and a roast potato, amounting to 300 calories, although she was advised to consume between 500 and 1,000 calories per day. Once again, Malissa is told that because of her weight she will likely die of a heart attack within months, only now the challenge is to eat enough to keep her alive.

Too late for regrets

In an interview from 2009, Malissa admits that she wishes she had never had the gastric bypass surgery, and that she liked her body better before when she was fat. The cost for excessive skin removal is $33,000, more than this 21-year-old, who had to quit her job because of disability caused by anorexia, can afford to save up. While the NHS agreed to pay for her $20,00 weight loss surgery, they have not agreed to fund the plastic surgery required to remove the scarred, wrinkled, overhanging skin which typically results from rapid weight loss.

“At least it was firm and curvy, not droopy and saggy,” she says. “I had nice firm arms – now the skin just hangs and I have to cover them up because they look so awful.”

In addition to suffering anorexia, Malissa has chronic depression, for which she takes antidepressants; she also suffers gastrointestinal diseases, chronic fatigue and low immunity. Because she is not able to follow a healthy nutritious diet, her immune system has been severely compromised, leaving her at risk for infections.

On a final note, Malissa has this to say to any obese individuals considering gastric bypass surgery:

“I wish I’d lost the weight through exercise and healthy eating. I know this operation was life-saving, but the complications I’m suffering now might still kill me. The truth is I feel I’m no better off than I was before.”

For more information on some of the risks involved with gastric bypass surgery, please read:

10 Mistakes Gastric Bypass Patients Often Make

Should Kelly Osbourne Consider Gastric Bypass Surgery?


Daily Mail



News of the World

Herald Sun


Study: Gastric Bypass as a Cure for Diabetes?

Monday, May 2nd, 2011



A new study proves that gastric bypass weight loss surgery reduces the symptoms of diabetes.


Scientists have known for some time now that patients with type 2 diabetes who undergo gastric bypass surgery often find that in addition to the losing weight, their bodies’ response to insulin often improves dramatically. About 50 to 80 percent of diabetics who get gastric bypass surgery have also had their diabetes go into remission.

Also read: Gastric Bypass Surgery: Good for the Heart

Until recently, scientists were not able to explain exactly how gastric bypass surgery affects diabetics’ blood sugar levels. Now, according to an LA Times article, new research has provided some interesting clues as to the health benefits of bariatric surgery for patients with type 2 diabetes- health benefits that seemingly have nothing to do with the weight loss itself.

Here are the details of that study, which was published recently in Science Translational Medicine:
  • Scientists from Columbia University and Duke University studies two control groups of obese diabetic patients at a New York hospital.
  • One group of 10 individuals agreed to gastric bypass surgery; another group of 11 people who suffered morbid obesity were put on a strict diet regimen.
  • On average, each of the obese diabetics in both groups lost between 22-26 pounds.
  • Next, scientists compared the levels of circulating amino acids and acylcarnitines in blood tests collected from both groups. Previous studies, such as reported by Web MD, have proven a strong link between “branched-chain” amino acids and resistance to insulin.
  • Within 1 month of receiving weight loss surgery, the gastric bypass patients had significantly lower levels of the branched-chain amino acids; obese diabetics who lost weight by dieting showed little or no change in their branched-chain amino acid count, and no significant improvement in their response to insulin.

Decreased branched-chain amino acid levels

directly decreased that patient’s resistance

to insulin.

“Something happens after gastric bypass that does not happen as much after the diet-induced weight loss,” explained Dr. Blandine Laferrere, associate professor at Columbia University.
Also read: Diabetics, Take Heed

This Reuters report describes the gastric bypass procedure as a Roux-en-Y type of bariatric surgery, in which doctors essentially reduce the size of the stomach pouch, causing patients to eat less. Christopher Newgard, professor at Duke University, who also was involved in this study, believes that these metabolic changes are case-specific to the gastric bypass surgery used for this research; he doesn’t believe the getting a Lap-Band would produce similar results in obese diabetics.
Now that researchers understand how gastric bypass surgery impacts insulin resistance, scientists hope to develop a diabetes medication which will replicate these results without the need for surgery.
Also read:
10 Mistakes Gastric Bypass Patients Often Make

Teens and Weight Loss Surgery: Worth the Risk?

USA Today, NPR, Reuters, LA Times, Web MD

10 Mistakes Gastric Bypass Patients Often Make

Saturday, April 16th, 2011


Gastric bypass surgery, along with other forms of weight loss surgery (WSL), can be a life saving option for the morbidly obese, but it does have its drawbacks. Teens and adults alike risk losing bone mass and getting severe vitamin B12 deficiency or pernicious anemia, to name just a few potentially harmful side effects.

Teens and Weight Loss Surgery: Worth the Risk?

To the yo-yo dieter, the decision to undergo gastric bypass surgery might seem like that “golden ticket” she’s been searching for all her life, but the post-op reality is often far from the Cinderella-like fantasy she’s been indulging in.

Here are 10 mistakes often made by gastric bypass patients which you should know about before electing for bariatric surgery:

Mistake #1: Not taking your vitamins!

10 MISTAKES GASTRIC BYPASS PATIENTS OFTEN MAKE, WWW.B12PATCH.COMGastric bypass patients are given a medication to inhibit the production of stomach acids which are essential for digesting vitamins such as vitamin B12. Often in the case that a doctor releases his weight loss surgery patient with the ill advise to take a daily chewable multivitamin, such as the type given to children. The reality is, if you decide to go under the knife for weight loss surgery, expect to make a lifelong commitment to taking a heap of WLS-approved chewable vitamins every day in order to prevent vitamin deficiency, anemia, neurological damage and, in extreme cases, death.

Mistake #2: Thinking your struggles with food are over!

Nothing could be further from the truth; the body may have gotten slimmer, but your brain still longs for the good old days of binge eating. Behavior modification and counseling is crucial for successful weight loss, whether you’ve lost the weight naturally or on the surgeon’s table.

Mistake #3: Thinking you will be slim and trim!

10 MISTAKES GASTRIC BYPASS PATIENTS OFTEN MAKE, WWW.B12PATCH.COMWeight loss surgery patients do lose an immense amount of weight, as promised, but don’t expect to look like Pamela Anderson anytime soon; the reality is, many gastric bypass patients don’t reach their intended goal, nor do they necessarily keep all of the weight off. And remember, all that excess skin doesn’t just shrink back into your body; weight loss surgery patients often resort to plastic surgery, either for cosmetic or health reasons, to have a tummy tuck, arm skin flaps (batwings) removed or facial skin tightened.

Mistake #4: Eating unhealthy foods

Just because you can no longer fit a triple-decker cheeseburger and fries into your now petite stomach doesn’t mean you should try. Weight loss surgery patients are often faced with the difficult challenge of choosing food wisely at parties, evenings out and other situations where the sky is the limit.

Mistake #5: Not staying hydrated!

10 MISTAKES GASTRIC BYPASS PATIENTS OFTEN MAKE, WWW.B12PATCH.COMBariatric surgery patients run a serious risk of dehydration if they don’t drink 8 servings of water per day. Additionally, water is crucial for avoiding kidney stones or gall stones, an excruciatingly painful and common side effect of many weight loss surgeries.

Mistake #6: Snacking!

Gastric bypass surgery is effective because it prevents you from fitting a large amount of food in you tummy at one time; resist the impulse to consume small mini-snacks throughout the day, lest you find yourself back in your pre-surgery body.

Mistake #7: Not exercising!

Alas, it amounts to this: aerobic exercise and weight training are that unavoidable truth lurking behind every weight loss goal, and bariatric surgery patients are not exempt.  Physical exercise increases muscle, improves circulation, burns calories, provides energy and fights depression.


Even small amounts of refined sugars and flours can put on the pounds.  Avoid white rice, starchy bread rolls and sticky sweets in favor of brown rice or barley, whole-grain breads or crackers and fresh fruits of the season.


Mistake #9: Drinking carbonated beverages!

Weight loss surgery patients are advised to avoid diet sodas and other bubbly drinks; many believe that they can inflate stomach pouch, reversing the effects of the surgery.

Mistake #10: Drinking alcoholic beverages!

10 MISTAKES GASTRIC BYPASS PATIENTS OFTEN MAKE, WWW.B12PATCH.COMRecent reports suggest that post-surgery, many gastric bypass patients develop a sensitivity to alcohol. Doctors recommend holding off on alcohol for at least one year after having any type of weight loss surgery.



Also read:

Should Kelly Osbourne Consider Gastric Bypass Surgery?

Gastric Bypass Surgery: Good for the Heart


Gastric Bypass Truth

Home | Shipping & Return Policy | Privacy Policy | Product Information | Research | Order Now | Customer Reviews | Site Map | Affiliate Program
B12 Patch