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Posts Tagged ‘irritable bowel syndrome IBS’

Stomach Bloating from B12 Deficiency? Yes, It Happens.

Thursday, October 17th, 2013

 

 

If you suffer from constant lot of stomach bloating and other signs of indigestion, it can be linked to vitamin B12 deficiency. Your ability to digest vitamin B12 and use it to prevent pernicious anemia can be traced directly to the environment in your gut. Symptoms of stomach bloating can be the first clue in distinguishing why you’re suffering from vitamin B12 deficiency, and how to prevent it.

Stomach Bloating from B12 Deficiency? Yes, It Happens.

Vitamin B12 malabsorption

When your digestive system is not working properly, then you’re not getting enough vitamin B12. That’s because unlike other vitamins, B12 cannot be absorbed from foods without the help of certain digestive enzymes that are produced by your parietal cells of the stomach.  

Gastritis (stomach inflammation) is one of several causes of vitamin B12 malabsorption.

So even though you eat plenty of meat, chicken, and fish, you aren’t getting the vitamin B12 you need in order to survive. And it all stems from your gastrointestinal health.

What Causes Vitamin B12 Malabsorption?

Pernicious anemia occurs in the stomach

Intrinsic factor is one such protein that your body needs, both to extract cobalamin (vitamin B12) from food and to utilize it efficiently so that it reaches your blood stream.

But with digestive disorders such as Crohn’s disease, or if there is any type of damage to your esophagus, stomach walls, or intestinal tract, then you run a high risk for vitamin B12 deficiency, and possibly pernicious anemia.

So while people assume that pernicious anemia is a blood disease, it really begins in the stomach, with bloating, acid reflux, and heartburn.

Symptoms of stomach disorders

The following symptoms, if they occur often, may indicate a breakdown in your digestive system that requires immediate treatment in order to prevent vitamin B12 deficiency and many other ailments:

  • Acid reflux
  • Heartburn
  • Vomiting
  • Abdominal pain
  • Chest pains
  • Shortness of breath
  • Nausea
  • Stomach bloating
  • Hardening of the stomach
  • Loss of appetite
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • “Lump” in your throat
  • Diarrhea
  • Constipation
  • Frequent burping
  • Flatulence

IBD or IBS- What’s the Difference in a Tummy Ache?

Comorbid illnesses

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are comorbid with vitamin B12 deficiency, as are many other autoimmune disorders and chronic pain conditions.

The following illnesses and health problems cause damage to the stomach that may also lead to vitamin B12 deficiency:

  • Crohn’s disease
  • Ulcerative colitis
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)
  • Migraines
  • Celiac disease
  • Stomach ulcers
  • Diverticulitis
  • Esophageal stricture

Please tell us…

Have you been experiencing stomach bloating and other signs of digestive disorders, but didn’t realize they were connected to vitamin B12 deficiency?

Do you have any questions or suggestions?  Please leave your comments below.

Share with your friends!

If you found this article helpful, then please share with your friends, family, and coworkers by email, twitter, or Facebook.

Like this? Read more:

Vitamin B12 Deficiency Caused by H. Pylori Infection

Here’s your Crohn’s Disease Survival Kit

Image courtesy of Ohmega1982/freedigitalphotos

Top 20 Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Do’s and Don’ts- Part II: Do This!

Tuesday, March 20th, 2012

 

 

Part I of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Do’s and Don’ts covered bad eating habits and lifestyle choices that cause IBS; now, learn how testing for vitamin B12 deficiency or other illnesses, along with eating healthy digestion-friendly foods, can help to promote intestinal health where IBS occurs.

TOP 20 IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME (IBS) DO’S AND DON’TS

Recap: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a digestive disorder that causes stomachache, heartburn, and nausea.  Sometimes, IBS correlates with vitamin B12 deficiency; other times, IBS happens because of other comorbid conditions or bad eating habits.

#1 Do this!  Check your vitamin B12 levels

Often, people who suffer from digestive problems also have dangerously low vitamin B12 levels, as many GI disorders like Crohn’s disease, celiac disease, fibromyalgia, gastritis, and general IBS may cause vitamin B12 deficiency-pernicious anemia.

Getting a blood test for vitamin B12 deficiency is crucial if you suffer from IBS- untreated, vitamin B12 deficiency can cause severe nerve damage, reduced cognitive functioning, emotional disorders, movement disorders, and increased risk for heart attack and stroke.

If you are diagnosed with vitamin B12 deficiency, then your doctor will need to prescribe vitamin B12 (cobalamin) supplements, usually in the form of vitamin B12 shots.

#2 Do this!  See a gastroenterologist.

If you’ve been suffering from stomach problems for a long time, then make an appointment with a gastroenterologist.  In order to diagnose IBS, your doctor will have to rule out other possibilities, such as GERD, ulcer, lactose intolerance, food allergies, celiac disease, or esophagitis.

#3 Do this!  Eat healthy foods

To promote digestive health, eat a diet of whole, low-fat foods.  A healthy diet always includes fiber from whole grains, fruits, and vegetables, in addition to lean proteins.  To replenish electrolytes, eat small amounts of oatmeal topped with banana slices.

TOP 20 IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME (IBS) DO’S AND DON’TS

#4 Do this! Take digestive enzymes

Your body produces 22 digestive enzymes naturally to help you break down food and access essential vitamins and minerals.  One of them is intrinsic factor, an enzyme produced in your stomach that aids in digesting vitamin B12.  Lack of intrinsic factor may be caused by an autoimmune disorder or damage to your esophagus, leading to vitamin B12 deficiency.

Some plant-based digestive enzymes are available in pill form, including amylase, lipase, cellulase, and protease.

#5 Do this!  Eat healthy bacteria

For optimum digestion, snack on foods containing healthy “good” bacteria.  Yogurt or kefirs are healthy if you’re lactose-tolerant; look out for brands that are labeled with “live and active cultures.”  Kimchi, a pickled cabbage condiment, is doubly healthy for your digestive system; one, because it replenishes the GI tract with health flora, and two, because cabbage is a non-digestible fiber that helps your body remove toxins and waste.

Gut Bugs:Winning the Bacteria Battle

#6 Do this!  Enjoy ginger

In small doses (2 to 4 grams), fresh or dried ginger helps to maintain digestive health and increase appetite. For ginger juice, grate ginger and then run through a garlic press, catching the droplets in a cup.  Add to tea, stews, or salads.  Be careful- ginger is very potent, and too much can cause heartburn.

#7 Do this!  Listen to your body cues

Overeating and indigestion often occur because we eat too quickly and don’t pay attention to our body cues.  Just as you get hunger pangs when it’s time to eat, you also get subtle cues when you’ve had enough, and some not-so-subtle cues- stomachache and heartburn- that you’ve overindulged.  One of the most important lessons in eating healthy is learning to tell the difference between hunger and cravings, and to know when you’re satisfied.

#8 Do this!  Take the right medicine

Certain medications your doctor may prescribe for treating indigestion may include antidiarrheal medicines, antispasmodics, or laxatives.

Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs) – B12 Deficiency and 5 other Health Risks

TOP 20 IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME (IBS) DO’S AND DON’TS

#9 Do this!  Put a curfew on eating

At the end of the day, you tend to slow down; so does your metabolism.  Eating a big dinner that includes desserts is a sure way to cause debilitating indigestion.  Instead, eat an early dinner, or make lunchtime the biggest meal of the day, and resist the temptation to snack in the evening after 6:00 or 7:00 pm.

#10 Do this!  Exercise

Regular exercise promotes healthy digestion by reducing stress, boosting your metabolism, helping your maintain a healthy weight, and increasing circulation.  To benefit from exercise, you don’t need to succumb to intense, 40-minute workouts.  Just walking, riding a stationary bike, or swimming for 20-30 minutes each day is enough to prevent heart disease, obesity, and digestive disorders.

Please tell us…

Have you been experiencing unusual stomach problems, such as feeling uncomfortably full after eating light meals, waking up in the middle of the night with acid reflux, or chronic diarrhea?  Have you had your vitamin B12 levels tested?  IBS sometimes causes pernicious anemia from vitamin B12 deficiency.

As always, we welcome your comments, suggestions, and questions.

Spread the love…

Please share this article with your friends and family on Facebook or Google+!

Read more about vitamin B12 deficiency and IBS

Top 20 Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Do’s and Don’ts- Part I: Don’t do that!

8 Ailments Linked with Gastritis, including B12 Deficiency

Absorbing Vitamin B12, a Metabolic Gastrointestinal Journey

Sources:

Pernicious anemia: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia

Indigestion: MedlinePlus

Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Indigestion – Self help

Images:

Grant Cochrane, Wikimedia

Top 20 Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Do’s and Don’ts- Part I: Don’t do that!

Monday, March 19th, 2012

 

 

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a digestive disorder that causes stomachache, heartburn, and nausea.  Sometimes, IBS causes vitamin B12 deficiency; other times, IBS happens because of other comorbid conditions or bad eating habits.  In part one of Top 20 Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Do’s and Don’ts, learn how to treat IBS symptoms by changing your eating habits and making smarter lifestyle choices.

TOP 20 IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME (IBS) DO’S AND DON’TS

Symptoms of IBS

About 20% of Americans suffer symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome, or IBS, which may vary in severity from uncomfortable to debilitating.  IBS does not cause any harm to your digestive system, nor does it lead to any life-threatening diseases.  Depending on what’s causing IBS, be it vitamin B12 deficiency or Crohn’s disease, you may have most or just a few of the following symptoms:

  • Heartburn that is not relieved by antacids
  • Acid reflux
  • Severe stomach cramps
  • Belching
  • Bloated feeling
  • Flatulence
  • Nausea
  • Loss of appetite
  • Vomiting
  • Dizziness
  • Fatigue
  • Blood in stools
  • Diarrhea
  • Constipation

Top 20 Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Do’s and Don’ts- Part I: Don’t do that!

#1 Don’t do that!  Overeat

Indulging in large meals is the most common eating-related cause of IBS.  Your body needs only a small amount of food to be satisfied.  By eating more than your stomach can handle in one sitting, you cause stomach discomfort, acid indigestion, painful heartburn, and obesity.  Instead of eating a day’s worth of calories at once, break them down into several small meals throughout the day.

However, if you eat normal-sized meals, yet feel your throat closing up while eating, or if you have trouble swallowing food, then it might indicate pernicious anemia, which may be diagnosed with a vitamin B12 blood test.

#2 Don’t do that!  Rush through meals

Do you give yourself a long time to enjoy a meal? If not, you may be causing severe indigestion.  While you eat, your stomach sends messages to your brain, signaling you when it’s time to stop eating.  Once your stomach is comfortably full, you feel satiated.  However, it may take as long as 20 minutes the message to come full circle.  So by eating in a hurry, you don’t give yourself a chance to stop eating in time to avoid overeating and indigestion.  Instead, eat slowly, put your fork down between bites, and pay attention to your stomach signals.

#3 Don’t do that!  Eat processed foods

Processed foods are the source of many gastrointestinal ills.  What are processed foods?  Anything food that’s been stripped of its nutritional value through processing, resulting in a nutritionally-devoid, hard-to-digest product may, over time, cause stomach upset, bacterial infections, vitamin deficiency, and obesity.  Anything containing white flour, white rice, white sugar, or many food additives may cause IBS symptoms.


TOP 20 IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME (IBS) DO’S AND DON’TS

#4 Don’t do that!  Eat trigger foods

Certain trigger foods may exacerbate IBS or illnesses like Crohn’s disease and fibromyalgia.  Likely food triggers are fried or fatty foods, spicy dishes, caffeinated beverages, carbonated drinks, alcohol, fruits with small seeds, chocolate, corn, and dairy products.  All of these may cause acid reflux, heartburn, diarrhea, and stomach cramping.

#5 Don’t do that!  Drink during meals

Having a sip of mineral water between bites may seem like a good idea for weight control, but it also causes indigestion.  Every time you wash down your food with liquids, you dilute essential stomach acids, thereby reducing their potency and triggering heartburn, acid indigestion, and tummy aches.  Instead, drink down a large glass of water before eating- you’ll digest your food better and feel full sooner!

#6 Don’t do that!  Mindless eating

Another mistake people often make is eating in front of the television, while reading, standing at the buffet table, or worse yet- while driving your car.  Eating on “autopilot” causes you to eat too much, too fast, and makes it almost impossible for you to recognize feelings of satiety.  As a rule, always eat white seated at a table, minus the TV or computer screen.

Vitamin B12 for Weight Loss- Why it Works

#7 Don’t do that!  Lie down after eating

Your metabolism doesn’t function well in sedentary mode; for that reason, it’s important to avoid slumping on the couch after a meal.  For better digestion, plan light workouts like walking for an after-meal activity.

#8 Don’t do that!  Medications

Lay off medicines that can worsen heartburn and acid reflux, such as sleeping pills.  Also, overusing acid reflux meds for heartburn can increase your risk for bacterial infections, in addition to interfering with vitamin B12 absorption.

#9 Don’t do that!  Stress out

Stress is a common cause of stomach problems.  For people with IBS, anxiety, fatigue, and anger can cause muscle spasms in the colon.  Incorporate exercise, relaxation techniques, and vitamin therapy into your daily regimen for optimum psychological health.  If necessary, antidepressants prescribed by your doctor may be helpful.

Sometimes, extreme stress, depression, and anxiety correlate with severe vitamin B12 deficiency.  Other mental disorders correlated with B12 deficiency include paranoia, hallucinations, and unusual aggressiveness.

When Vitamin B12 Deficiency has you under its Spell…of Depression

Top 20 Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Do’s and Don’ts- Part I: Don’t do that!

#10 Don’t do that!  Smoke

Not only does smoking cigarettes damage your lungs, it also affects your digestive system, causing acid reflux and esophageal damage, as well.  Improve your chances of living a long, healthy life- ask your doctor for advice on quitting smoking, for good.

Please tell us…

Have you been experiencing unusual stomach problems, such as feeling uncomfortably full after eating light meals, waking up in the middle of the night with acid reflux, or chronic diarrhea?

Have you had your vitamin B12 levels tested?  Gastrointestinal disorders sometimes lead to vitamin B12 deficiency, so people with GI issues are recommended to get their vitamin B12 levels checked routinely.

As always, we welcome your comments, suggestions, and questions.

Spread the love…

Please share this article with your friends and family on Facebook or Google+!

Read more about vitamin B12 deficiency and IBS

8 Ailments Linked with Gastritis, including B12 Deficiency

Gastrointestinal Surgery for Crohn’s (IBD) and B12 Warnings

Sources:

Pernicious anemia: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia

Indigestion: MedlinePlus

Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Indigestion – Self help

Images:

Nutdanai Apikhomboonwaroot, euthmanSean Rogers1, stevendepolo

12 Fermented Foods that are Good for your Gut- Probiotics

Friday, July 22nd, 2011

 

 

Treat IBD naturally and deliciously by including these anti-inflammatory fermented foods in your diet.

12 FERMENTED FOODS THAT ARE GOOD FOR YOUR GUT- PROBIOTICS, WWW.B12PATCH.COM

There’s a war brewing in your tummy!

Whether you suffer from IBS (irritable bowel syndrome) or IBD (inflammatory bowel disease), such as Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis, you know that the best way to treat your tummy right is by following a diet rich in probiotic foods.

Probiotics are live microorganisms that occur naturally in aged foods, such as pickles and yogurt.  Consider them your allies in fighting your body’s war between good and evil! (bacteria-wise, that is.)

When it comes to promoting gastrointestinal integrity, the health benefits of probiotics are unrivaled.

Gut Bugs:Winning the Bacteria Battle

12 Great  probiotics

1- Yogurt

Yogurt is an old standby for people who understand the health benefits of probiotic foods, and for good reason.

Many brands of yogurt contain live cultures that keep your tummy calm and balanced, even after taking antibiotics.

Keep in mind that not all yogurts are alike- only the ones that are marked “active cultures” or “live cultures” on the label have potent probiotics.

12 FERMENTED FOODS THAT ARE GOOD FOR YOUR GUT- PROBIOTICS, WWW.B12PATCH.COM

2- Kefir

Kefir is a popular European drink that contains a mixture of goat milk and fermented kefir grains.  In addition to antioxidants, kefir is also rich in lactobacilli and bifidus bacteria.

3- Buttermilk

Buttermilk is a nourishing drink that adds creaminess and rich flavor to Ranch salad dressings, pancakes, and cornbread.  It is also an excellent source of probiotic cultures.

Natural Treatments for the Symptoms of Crohn’s Disease

4- Sour cream

Sour cream is a fermented condiment that contains healthy bacteria.  Use it sparingly, as it is high in fat.

5- Miso

Miso is a traditional Japanese condiment that consists of a fermented paste produced by soybeans, barley, or rice.  It adds a salty, smoky flavor to soups and sauces.

6- Tempeh

Tempeh is an excellent vegetarian source of vitamin B12.  Produced from fermented soybeans, tempeh is a meatier alternative to tofu and makes a satisfying centerpiece in vegan main meals.

12 FERMENTED FOODS THAT ARE GOOD FOR YOUR GUT- PROBIOTICS, WWW.B12PATCH.COM

7- Natto

Natto is another soy product featured in Japanese cuisine, containing bacillus subtilis.  It has a pungent quality that true lovers of vegetarian cookery enjoy.

8- Sauerkraut

This fermented cabbage began its gastronomical career as a popular German condiment; today, hot dog enthusiasts all over the USA delight in topping their frankfurters with tangy sauerkraut.

The 20 Do’s and Don’ts of the GERD Diet

9- Kimchi

Kimchi is a traditional Korean condiment made of assorted pickled vegetables.  Like sauerkraut, kimchi contains fermented cabbage, in addition to onions, carrots, and garlic.

Unlike sauerkraut, kimchi has a hot ‘n spicy kick to it.

10- Kombucha tea

Kombucha tea, a health food staple that contains live cultures, is an ancient tonic that promotes healthy gut bacteria.

11- Pickles

Dill pickles, bread and butter pickles, or half-sours: any way you slice them, pickled cucumbers are a tasty, crunchy source of gut-friendly probiotics.

12- Unpasteurized olives

Naturally fermented, unpasteurized olives have a unique, full-bodied flavor that is lacking in traditionally bottled pasteurized olives.  Like all olives, they are equally beneficial for heart health.

12 FERMENTED FOODS THAT ARE GOOD FOR YOUR GUT- PROBIOTICS, WWW.B12PATCH.COM

Related Reading:

15 Steps to Better Digestion

Crohn’s Disease Suggested Dinner Menu, plus Recipes

Ten Foods to avoid if you have Inflammatory Bowel Disorder

101 Helpful Sites for Kids ‘n Teens with Crohn’s (and their Parents)

On the Run with Crohn’s? 6 Ways to Ease Public Restroom Anxiety

Sources:

Top 10 Probiotic Foods to Add to Your Diet

Top Probiotic Foods You Are Not Eating | The Conscious Life

The Best Probiotic Foods | LIVESTRONG.COM

13 Natural Probiotic Food Sources

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