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Posts Tagged ‘sources of b12’

Low B12 means Low Thyroid- Hypothyroidism and B12 Deficiency

Tuesday, November 8th, 2011



Being tired all the time is a symptom of B12 deficiency, but it can also signal hypothyroidism (low thyroid), a thyroid disease that occurs with low B12 levels.  Because hypothyroid symptoms are similar, vitamin B12 deficiency often goes undetected.


B12 deficiency causes fatigue, depression, and other mood disorders often associated with an underactive thyroid. If you’ve been diagnosed with thyroiditis, then it’s also important also to recognize the symptoms of B12 deficiency, and know whether you might require more vitamin B12 (cobalamin).

What is hypothyroidism?

Hypothyroidism is an autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) that occurs in the thyroid gland, causing inflammation, and reducing its ability to produce sufficient amounts of thyroid hormones.
Hashimoto’s disease is one example of thyroiditis that causes low thyroid levels.  

Sometimes, thyroid treatment for hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid), such as radioactive iodine or surgery, can backfire, causing underactive thyroid symptoms.

Why am I always tired?  Symptoms of hypothyroidism

Symptoms of low thyroid include:

  • Empty facial expressions
  • Husky, gravelly voice
  • Chronic fatigue, tiredness
  • Sluggish, droning speech patterns
  • “Brain fog,” or confusion
  • Depression
  • Uncontrolled weight gain
  • Droopy eyelids
  • Puffy, bloated face
  • Constipation
  • Diarrhea
  • Dry skin and hair
  • Sparse hair, including eyebrows
  • Tingling and numbness in the hands and feet
  • Muscular pain
  • Feebleness
  • Slow resting heart rate
  • Orange-colored skin on the hands and feet
  • Heavy menstrual periods in women


Vitamin B12 for Healthy Hair, Skin and Nails

Vitamin B12 deficiency symptoms

Vitamin B12 is a water-soluble nutrient that is responsible for making red blood cells, controlling DNA synthesis, regulating the nervous system, and improving cognitive functioning.  Without proper levels of vitamin B12, you may suffer neurological damage, dementia, or heart attack resulting from elevated homocysteine levels.

Low B12 symptoms include:

  • Depression
  • Chronic fatigue, tiredness
  • Anxiety
  • Short-term memory loss
  • “Brain fog,” or confusion
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Neurosis
  • Altered taste perception
  • Swollen, red tongue
  • Tingling and numbness in the hands and feet
  • Awkward hand movements
  • Loss of balance
  • Clumsiness and stumbling
  • Sleep problems


Balance your B12, Balance your Nerves

Thyroid disease and low B12 levels

In a study conducted in Sapir Medical Center, Kfar Saba, Israel, patients with autoimmune thyroid disease received blood screening for vitamin B12 deficiency.  Researchers noted a significantly high percentage of people with AITD who also had vitamin B12 deficiency caused by pernicious anemia, a disease that inhibits proper absorption of vitamin B12.

Another study conducted in Pakistan by Aga Khan University produced similar results; namely, a 40% prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency among patients with hypothyroidism.

Hypothyroidism treatment

If you are a patient of hypothyroidism, then physicians strongly recommend routine blood testing for vitamin B12 deficiency, regardless of thyroid hormone levels.

Read more about B12 deficiency:

6 Degrees of Vitamin B12- B12 Deficiency and Autoimmune Disease

Worried about Low B12 Lab Results?

Female Rapper Missy Elliot, 15 Celebs with Thyroid Disorders


Prevalence and evaluation of B12 deficiency in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease- PubMed NCBI

Hypothyroidism- PubMed Health

Vitamin B12 deficiency common in primary hypothyroidism- PubMed NCBI

Hypothyroidism & Vitamin B12 Deficiency- LIVESTRONG.COM

Vitamin B12 deficiency common in primary hypothyroidism

Image credits, from top:

vitasamb2001, jscreationzs, Ambro

Pregnant Moms and Low B-12 Levels: Let ‘em Eat Steak!

Wednesday, March 23rd, 2011

New study links high levels of B-12 in healthy food during pregnancy with less colicky babies

Steak might be the last thing in the world you can think of eating right now, if you happen to be a newly-pregnant mom-to-be, particularly if you’re in the beginning stages of morning sickness. But a study published by Early Human Development proves that eating a healthy diet during your pregnancy which included foods high in vitamin B-12  will guarantee a happy, less colicky baby who cries less.


In this study on prenatal health and B-12 in pregnancy, 3,000 pregnant women were examined.

  • Each participant submitted to blood testing during the initial prenatal check-up at three months, which included measuring the levels of vitamin B-12 in their blood.
  • Following childbirth, each subject kept a log of how often her baby cried, and for how long.
  • Scientists notes that the new moms who had particularly low levels of B-12 in pregnancy were eight times more likely to have babies who cried excessively and were difficult to placate than the pregnant moms who had high levels of B-12.
  • 5% of moms who exhibited B-12 deficiency symptoms gave birth to colicky babies, where only about 1% of moms who had sufficient levels of vitamin B-12 had babies who tended to cry a lot.

Scientists say,“This study provides first evidence for an early nutritional origin in infant crying behavior.”


  • Healthy nutrition during pregnancy is key to having a happy baby; eat foods during pregnancy which are rich in vitamin B-12.
  • Extensive research has been done linking vitamin B-12 with healthy brain functioning, neurological development and production of red blood cells.
  • A high correlation exists between B-12 deficiency and autistic children. Other symptoms of  B-12 deficiency may include short term memory loss, chronic fatigue, difficulty sleeping, numbness in hands and pernicious anemia.
  • Good sources of B-12 include all meat, fish, dairy and egg products, particularly shellfish, liver and lean cuts of beef.

Certain factors may interfere with one’s ability to utilize vitamin B-12 naturally.

  • Pregnant women on vegetarian diets must take vitamin B-12 supplements in order to make up for its exclusion in their diets.
  • Any persons taking antacids or other heartburn medication must also take B-12 in order to avoid deficiency, as these medications interfere with B-12 absorption.
  • Other people at risk include gastric bypass patients, individuals with autoimmune disorders or malabsorption syndromes.


Daily Mail, Inhabitots, Dallas News, Wellsphere, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics, AyushvedaEarly Human Development

Photo Credits:

Pregnant Woman- Morguefile.com, Steak- Morguefile.com

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