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Posts Tagged ‘Vitamin B12 Injection’

Vitamin B12- How much do you need?

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2011



Do you know how much vitamin B12 you need in order to avoid vitamin B12 deficiency? Unless you supplement, you could wind up with dangerously low vitamin B12 levels.  Find out if your B12 blood levels are normal and how much you need to meet the FDA’s RDA for vitamin B12.


What are the symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency?

Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin) is a water-soluble nutrient that your body gets from protein sources, such as beef, chicken, liver, fish, eggs, and dairy products.  Your body uses vitamin B12 for DNA synthesis, protecting your nervous system, and strengthening cognitive skills.  Symptoms that indicate a low vitamin B12 level include constant fatigue, difficulty concentrating, memory loss, tingling or numbness in your hands and feet, depression, agitation, altered taste perception, and red, swollen tongue.


How much B12 is in my blood right now?

By performing a blood test, your doctor can tell you if you are deficient in vitamin B12, or if you have normal B12 levels.  Vitamin B12 blood screening requires a 6-8 hour fast before testing.  Laboratory tests will measure how many picograms (pg) of cobalamin you have per milliliter (ml) of blood in your body.

How much B12 should I have?

  • Scientists agree that a normal level of vitamin B12 in your blood is 200 – 900 picograms per milliliter (200-900 pg/ml).
  • Test results showing less than 200 pg/ml signal vitamin B12 deficiency.
  • For elderly adults, the recommended vitamin B12 level is much higher- Test results showing less than 500 pg/ml indicates B12 deficiency.
  • In order to find the cause of a vitamin B12 deficiency, doctors may perform a Schilling test.

What is the recommended dose of vitamin B12?

  • The FDA’s RDA of vitamin B12 for healthy adults is approximately three mcg daily for males and females alike, including pregnant and nursing moms.
  • For elderly individuals, the recommended dose of vitamin B12 is 25-100 mcg per day.

Scientific study proves that the RDA for B12 is off.

  • According to a study conducted in the Netherlands, elderly sufferers of vitamin B12 deficiency need more than the recommended daily allowance (RDA) in order to achieve normal levels of B12.
  • Using methylmalonic acid (MMA) levels as a gauge, scientists established that cyanocobalamin supplementation amounting to 200 times the RDA of vitamin B12 is required in order to stabilize B12 levels in patients showing signs of vitamin B12 deficiency.


How much vitamin B12 do you really need?

How to keep Vitamin B12 Deficiency from Shrinking your Brain

Wednesday, September 28th, 2011



Brain health and vitamin B12 deficiency: Vitamin B12 is essential for maintaining cognitive health and addressing mild memory problems related to aging. Vitamin B12 deficiency is a common health problem for senior citizens who suffer the beginning stages of dementia.



Brain atrophy is what happens when brain tissue disintegrates.  In the beginning stages of Alzheimer’s disease or other forms of age-related dementia, a reduction in the brain’s gray matter correlates to symptoms such as memory loss, disorientation, paranoia, and uncharacteristically aggressive behavior.  In addition to losing brain volume, some elderly individuals also lose bone mass.


B12- the Brain Vitamin

In a recent study, elderly test participants who had vitamin B12 deficiency scored poorly on cognitive skills and memory testing, compared to their peers.  In addition, MRI scans indicated that senior citizens with low B12 levels also had less brain mass than peers who had normal levels of vitamin B12.

Cognitive Decline

This is not the first time that researchers found a correlation between vitamin B12 deficiency and cognitive health.  In 2008, Oxford University scientists discovered a link between elevated levels of homocysteine (an indicator of low vitamin B12 levels) and brain shrinkage.  Homocysteine is an amino acid that increases your chances of developing heart disease and stroke.


As you get older, your body slows down, and stops producing  as many stomach acids.  Unfortunately, your body still needs stomach acids in order to digest essential vitamins and minerals, especially vitamin B12.  People who lack sufficient stomach acids- the elderly, people on strong heartburn medications- lack the ability to digest vitamin B12 naturally, and must receive vitamin B12 supplements in order to prevent vitamin deficiency.


Elderly Care

In order to detect vitamin B12 deficiency, doctors recommend that elderly individuals receive regular blood testing for homocysteine levels and active vitamin B12, particularly if they exhibit any symptoms of cognitive decline, such as short-term memory loss.  If diagnosed with vitamin B12 deficiency, then your doctor will prescribe vitamin B12 injections or sublingual vitamin B12.

For extra vitamin B12, or as an alternative to painful injections, a popular option is to supplement with over-the-counter (OTC) vitamin B12.

Related reading:

12 Ways to Avoid Alzheimer’s Disease

Ten Bites to Better Brain Power

Can Aerobics Cure Alzheimer’s Disease?

Feed your Brain Something You’ll never Forget


Low Vitamin B12 Level in Elderly May Spur Dementia

B12 shortage linked to cognitive problems

Low Vitamin B12 May Speed Brain Shrinkage

Brain and Body Shrink Before Alzheimer’s Sets In


C Jill Reed, Vince Alongi, sabertasche2

Eating Your Way Out of Depression with B-12

Thursday, March 10th, 2011

We’ve all heard of overeaters binging themselves into a state of depression- a vicious circle which is difficult to get out of. But eating for happiness?

Vitamin B-12 deficiency is linked with depression

Vitamin B12 is essential for many aspects of brain development, such as myelination (the production of a protective layer around the brain) and the distributing of neurotransmitters to and from the brain. So it comes as no surprise that the Mayo Clinic suggests eating foods rich in vitamin B-12 as a means of preventing the onset of clinical depression.

“Eat to live, don’t live to eat.”

That’s a great motto if you happen to be an android. The fact is, eating is a sensual experience which we were meant to enjoy. (Why else would we have taste buds?) The key to good nutrition is finding foods you love that will love you right back.

Male depression is on the rise. Is it the recession or “Manpression?

Here are some yummy appetizers and entrées which are naturally high in vitamin B-12:

  • Fish tacos- Made popular by Rubio’s, the fish tacos is a tasty fusion of Cal-Mex and seafood cuisine.  Take a soft flour tortilla, add some fiery mango salsa, a dab of sour cream and a grilled fish fillet (hint: salmon is high in B-12).  It’s a wrap!
  • Are you a Sushi lover? Then you’re going to love this- sushi and sashimi recipes typically include such high-in-B12 ingredients as roe (fish eggs), octopus, crab, shrimp, and mackerel. Pass the soy sauce!
  • New England clam chowder- just the name elicits images of salty sea breezes, sailboats and clam bakes. Don’t have any recipes handy? Here is a list of variations on this classic soup recipe.
  • Lean cuts of lamb are high in vitamin B-12 and a popular staple of many Middle Eastern cuisines. Here is a flavorful Lamb Moussaka recipe, as featured in epicurious.
  • Tuna casserole is one of America’s fave comfort foods and it’s simple to make- combine canned tuna, cooked broad noodles, and a can of concentrated mushroom soup. Top it with some fried onions and pop it in the oven for 30 minutes. Tuna is high in B-12 and omega-3 fatty acids.
  • Hamburgers barbecued with low-fat ground beef chuck are a great source of vitamin B-12. Serve it up on whole-grain buns with a side of oven roasted root veggies for a healthy upgrade from the typical artery-clogging burgers ‘n fries.




What is a B12 injection?

Thursday, April 17th, 2008

A vitamin b12 injection (cyanocobalamin) is a synthetic form of vitamin b12.  The primary reason for getting a b12 injection is to treat b12 deficiency.  For many years b12 injections have also been given for patients suffering from fatigue and low energy.  The most common dosage is a 1000 microgram (mcg) b12 injection once a week. There are no upper limit dosages to vitamin b12 and there are no reported side effects to b12 overdose.

Vitamin B12 Injection Benefits

Monday, January 15th, 2007

About Vitamin B12 Injections

Vitamin B12 injections are only administered when there is no other way of supplementation. Injections are mostly used in cases of diseases caused by vitamin B12 deficiency. Injections are usually administered to people who have a medical problem known as pernicious anemia, a condition in which the patient is not capable of absorbing vitamin B12 via the intestine. Injections are also administered to those who suffer from a diseased intestine or have a large part of their stomach or intestines removed. Vitamin B12 injections are only given by or under the supervision of a health care professional. In the United States, injections of vitamin B12 are generally available in two types, cyanocobalamin and hydroxocobalamin.

Advantages of Vitamin B12 Injections

Vitamin B12 injections have been used for a long time, especially by many politicians and famous personalities from the entertainment industry. There are several reasons why. The injection contains 500 times more vitamin B12 than the recommended daily dosage.  When injected, vitamin B12 is easily absorbed by the body and then utilized in the formation of red blood cells as well as aiding in the maintenance of a healthy nervous and cardiovascular system.  The three major health benefits of vitamin B12 injections are an increase in energy, sleeping better, and a feeling of alertness.  However, people often complain of bruises and soreness in the area where the vitamin B12 was injected.

Vitamin B12 Injection

Sunday, January 14th, 2007

An Overview Of Intravenous Vitamin B12

Vitamin B-12 is necessary for many things, including growth, cell reproduction, and hematopoiesis. Generally vitamin B12 is administered in the form cyanocobalamin, which is absorbed in the muscles at the site of the injection. The level of plasma in the compound is found to be at its peak within an hour after the intramuscular injection is given. Almost 1000 micrograms, that is 50- 98 percent of vitamin B12, is present in the urine within 48 hours of the injection. Most of vitamin B12 is excreted in the urine. Some vitamin B12 is also absorbed through the intestinal tract.

Vitamin B-12 Injection

Vitamin B12 injection is in the form of Cyanocobalamin in a clear red, sterile and nonpyrogenic aqueous solution. The dosage for intramuscular injections is 1000 micrograms per milliliter.  The solution is hygroscopic in anhydrous form and also soluble in water.  The coenzymes of vitamin B12 in the solution are very unstable in the presence of light.  Apart from vitamin B12, the active ingredients of Cyanocobalamin injections are benzyl alcohol (as a preservative) and sodium chloride (for isotonicity).  It is important to know that doses of vitamin B12 that exceed 10 micrograms daily are capable of producing a hematologic response in patients who have folate deficiency. Also, pareteral administration of vitamin B12 can sometimes cause anaphylactic shock and even death.

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