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Posts Tagged ‘vitamin deficiencies’

Vitamin Deficiency symptoms List

Sunday, May 20th, 2012

What are the symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency…or any other vitamin deficiency, for that matter?  Fatigue, brain fog, muscular pain, and frequent numbness in the hands and feet could signal vitamin B12 deficiency, but what about all the other vitamins?  Here is a complete list of vitamins and minerals, plus symptoms that correlate with vitamin deficiencies.

VITAMIN DEFICIENCY SYMPTOMS LIST, B12 Patch

Vitamin A (Retinol)

Food sources: Yams, beef liver, spinach, carrots, and pumpkin.

Vitamin deficiency symptoms: Color-blindness, conjunctivitis, dry eyes, Bitot’s spots, farsightedness, corneal ulcers, ichthyosis (scaly skin), macular degeneration, photophobia, night blindness, keratosis, dry hair, ridged nails, peeling nails, acne, skin infections, jaundice, shingles, and wrinkles.

Vitamin B1 (Thiamine)

Food sources: Mushrooms, sunflower seeds, tuna, and broccoli.

Vitamin deficiency symptoms: Chronic fatigue, loss of appetite, nerve damage, heart palpitations, mental confusion, depression, dementia, forgetfulness, nervous irritability, Beriberi disease, crossed eyes, dim vision, glaucoma, Raynaud’s disease, sensitivity to insect bites, furrowed tongue, Addison’s disease, fungal infections, itching, white patches on tongue.

Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin)

Food sources: Liver, mushrooms, spinach, and dark green vegetables.

Vitamin deficiency symptoms: Loss of appetite, nerve damage, depression, nervous irritability, increased homocysteine levels (heart attack and stroke risk), blurred vision, cataracts, conjunctivitis, dim vision, glaucoma, retinitis, corneal ulcers, macular degeneration, night blindness, photophobia, eyelid tics, acne, Addison’s disease, eczema, fungal infections, seborrhea, itching, white-heads, rosacea, eczema around nose and ears, dandruff, oily hair, sore tongue, cracked lips at corners of the mouth, purplish or magenta tongue, white patches on tongue.

9 Vitamin Deficiencies and the People who are affected by them

Vitamin B3 (Niacin)

Food sources: Brown rice, tuna, mushrooms, liver, beans, and lean meat.

Vitamin deficiency symptoms: Loss of appetite, fatigue, mental confusion, depression, dementia, nervous irritability, diarrhea, acne, Addison’s disease, fungal infections, itching, reddish-brown skin on neck, white patches on tongue.

Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxal phosphate)

Food sources: Bananas, bell peppers, potato skins, garbanzo beans, prune juice, and dark green leafy vegetables.

Vitamin deficiency symptoms: Chronic fatigue, depression, nervous irritability, increased homocysteine levels (heart attack and stroke risk), numbness in the hands and feet, blurred vision, conjunctivitis, dark spots in front of the eyes, retinitis, corneal ulcers, macular degeneration, night blindness, eyelid tics, acne, Addison’s disease, eczema, edema, fungal infections, dermatitis around eyes and nose, skin infections, itching, jaundice, pale skin, vitiligo, dandruff, hair loss, white spots on nails, sore tongue, cracked lips at corners of the mouth, bad breath, canker sores, white patches on tongue.

VITAMIN DEFICIENCY SYMPTOMS LIST, B12 Patch

Vitamin B9 (Folic acid)

Food sources: Organ meat, beans, dark green leafy vegetables, beets, and cauliflower.

Vitamin deficiency symptoms: Mental confusion, depression, dementia, forgetfulness, nervous irritability, insomnia, aggression, cervical dysplasia, megaloblastic anemia, increased homocysteine levels (heart attack and stroke risk), nerve damage, failure to thrive, low birth weight, neural tube defects, breathlessness, heart palpitations, pale skin, reddish-brown skin on neck, graying hair, hangnails, cracked lips at corners of the mouth, canker sores, beefy, red tongue, gingivitis.

Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin)

Food sources: Organ meats, cod, halibut, salmon, shellfish, lean meat, eggs, and dairy products.

Vitamin deficiency symptoms: Chronic fatigue, loss of appetite, nerve damage, painful tingling and numbness in the hands and feet, loss of balance, movement problems, heart palpitations, breathlessness, mental confusion, hallucinations, depression, memory loss, dementia, forgetfulness, nervous irritability, increased homocysteine levels (heart attack and stroke risk), diarrhea, dim vision, retinitis, eyelid tics, miscarriages, fertility problems, Addison’s disease, brown pigmentation around small joints, fungal infections, itching, jaundice, pale skin, shingles, vitiligo, hair loss, sore tongue, beefy, red tongue, canker sores, white patches on tongue, altered sense of taste.

VITAMIN DEFICIENCY SYMPTOMS LIST, B12 Patch

Vitamin B12 Deficiency-13 Illnesses that Block B12 Absorption

Vitamin C (Ascorbic acid)

Food sources: Guava, papayas, strawberries, citrus fruits, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, bell peppers, and dark green leafy vegetables.

Vitamin deficiency symptoms: Chronic fatigue, loss of appetite, cataracts, conjunctivitis, crossed eyes, dark spots in front of the eyes, dim vision, glaucoma, retinitis, corneal ulcers, near-sightedness, acne, Addison’s disease, eczema, edema, skin infections, itching, jaundice, prickly-heat rash, shingles, wrinkles, hangnails, peeling nails, gingivitis.

VITAMIN DEFICIENCY SYMPTOMS LIST, B12 Patch

Vitamin D

Food sources: Salmon, sardines, shrimp, fish oil, yams, and dairy products fortified with vitamin D.

Vitamin deficiency symptoms: Nervous irritability, near-sightedness, increased risk for diabetes, rickets, skeletal deformities, muscular weakness, soft bones, muscular pain (especially lower back pain), frequent bone fractures, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, hypertension, hypocalcemia, muscle twitches, numbness in the hands and feet, irregular heartbeat.

Vitamin E

Food sources: Vegetable oils, wheat germ oil, dark green leafy vegetables, avocadoes, seeds, nuts, and whole grains.

Vitamin deficiency symptoms: Loss of appetite, nausea, anemia, immune system disorders, angina, muscular pain, tingling and numbness in the hands and feet, movement problems, miscarriages, fertility problems, bulging eyes, cataracts, crossed eyes, near-sightedness, acne, jaundice, shingles, wrinkles.

Calcium

VITAMIN DEFICIENCY SYMPTOMS LIST, B12 PatchFood sources: Yogurt, cheese, sardines, canned salmon, milk, and dark green leafy vegetables.

Vitamin deficiency symptoms: Osteoporosis, hypocalcemia, tingling and numbness in the hands and feet, muscular pain, irregular heartbeat, fatigue, loss of appetite, frequent bone fractures, peeling nails, ridged nails, gingivitis.

Magnesium

Food sources: Wheat bran, almonds, cashews, dark green leafy vegetables, tofu, beans, and seeds.

Vitamin deficiency symptoms: Loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, fatigue, weakness, tingling and numbness in the hands and feet, muscular pain, mood swings, irregular heartbeat, hypocalcemia, farsightedness, glaucoma, retinitis, macular degeneration, eyelid tics, Addison’s disease, edema, skin infections, jaundice, dandruff, bad breath.

Zinc

Food sources: Oysters, crab, lobsters, beef, poultry, and fortified cereals.

Vitamin deficiency symptoms: Diarrhea, immune system disorders, failure to thrive, poor concentration, dark spots in front of the eyes, retinitis, corneal ulcers, macular degeneration, night blindness, eyelid tics, acne, eczema, edema, dermatitis around eyes and nose, skin infections, jaundice, vitiligo, dandruff, dry and brittle hair, hair loss, white spots on nails, bad breath, canker sores.

Please tell us…

Did this article help you?

Do you have any questions or suggestions?  Please leave your comments below.

Share with your friends!

If you found this article helpful, then please share with your friends, family, and coworkers by email, Facebook, or Google+.

Read more about vitamin B12 deficiency

Is Vitamin B12 Deficiency an Autoimmune Disorder? Yup.

Top Ten Signs of a Vitamin B12 Deficiency


References:

Vitamin Chart :: Vitamin Deficiency Symptoms, Benefits, Food Sources

Deficiency Symptoms

Dietary Supplement Fact Sheets

Images:

Piyachok Thawornmatpiyato, AmbroGrant Cochrane

13 Essential Vitamins and Minerals for Crohn’s Disease

Tuesday, April 17th, 2012

 

 

Crohn’s disease is a chronic bowel disorder that causes damage to the intestinal tract, leading to vitamin deficiencies, severe stomach pains, diarrhea, and fever.  Doctors recommend following a restrictive diet for treating Crohn’s disease, in addition to adopting a strict vitamin regimen.  Here are the top 13 vitamins and minerals recommended for Crohn’s disease patients.

13 Essential Vitamins and Minerals for Crohn’s Disease, B12 Patch

Vitamin B12

In order to digest vitamin B12 (cobalamin) from food sources, your body has to be able to make intrinsic factor, an enzyme produced in the stomach that aids in vitamin B12 absorption.  Because Crohn’s disease destroys stomach tissue, it’s common for Crohn’s patients to acquire vitamin B12 deficiency, in addition to other nutritional deficiencies.

Symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency include everyday fatigue, sluggishness, memory loss, painful tingling and numbness in your extremities (feet, hands, tongue), anxiety, and dizziness.

To find out if you have vitamin B12 deficiency, ask your doctor for a blood test to measure vitamin B12 levels.

Treatment requires non-dietary vitamin B12 supplements, usually from a vitamin B12 shot or alternative method.

13 Essential Vitamins and Minerals for Crohn’s Disease, B12 Patch

Read Four Reasons to check your Vitamin B12 Levels with Crohn’s Disease

Folic acid

13 Essential Vitamins and Minerals for Crohn’s Disease, B12 PatchFolic acid is another essential B vitamin; it’s crucial for preventing birth defects in utero.  If you’re using the sulfa drug sulfasalazine for Crohn’s disease, then you are at high risk for developing folic acid deficiency.  Experts recommend taking 1 mg of folic acid per day.

Vitamin A

Because Crohn’s disease sufferers often have difficulty absorbing vitamin A from food, doctors highly recommend adding the A vitamin to your vitamin regimen.

Vitamin D

Experts have noted a high correlation of vitamin D deficiency among Crohn’s disease patients.  Vitamin D deficiency causes bone loss, muscular soreness, and weakness.  It’s also believed that vitamin D is essential for promoting immune system health.  Sun exposure increases vitamin D levels, but supplements are also available.

Vitamin E

Vitamin E deficiency is high among Crohn’s patients who have difficulty eating foods like dark leafy greens and nuts.  To avoid symptoms like muscular weakness, tingling, and numbness, experts recommend taking daily doses of vitamin E oil.

Vitamin K

Vitamin K occurs naturally in dark leafy veggies, and is essential for healthy blood clotting and bone strength.  If you have difficulty absorbing fat-soluble vitamins, then you should include vitamin K in your daily vitamin therapy.

Iron

Iron anemia is a risk factor with Crohn’s disease, due to intestinal bleeding.  Iron deficiency causes symptoms like extreme fatigue, paleness, and headaches.  A blood test can determine if you have iron deficiency.

13 Essential Vitamins and Minerals for Crohn’s Disease, B12 Patch

Calcium

Crohn’s disease increases your risk for calcium deficiency, especially if you are using corticosteroids as part of your immune system therapy.  Additionally, vitamin B12 deficiency, common among Crohn’s patients, increases your risk for bone loss.  Health experts recommend taking 1,000-1,200 mg of calcium supplements each day.

Magnesium

Crohn’s disease causes severe bouts of diarrhea, during which time high doses of magnesium are expelled rapidly.  To prevent magnesium deficiency, experts recommend supplementing with extra magnesium, especially during flare-ups.

On the Run with Crohn’s? 6 Ways to Ease Public Restroom Anxiety

Zinc

Zinc supplies are also depleted with chronic diarrhea, making this another essential nutrient to take regularly if you have Crohn’s disease.

Probiotics

13 Essential Vitamins and Minerals for Crohn’s Disease, B12 PatchProbiotics contain “good” bacteria that are helpful for boosting digestive health and preventing pouchitis, a common side effect resulting from pouch surgery.  For best results, ask your gastroenterologist to recommend a specific bacterial strain.

Gut Bugs:Winning the Bacteria Battle

Omega-3 fatty acids

Omega-3 fatty acids, such as the kind found in fish oil, are helpful for fighting inflammation, a common side effect of Crohn’s disease.

Glutamine

Glutamine is an amino acid that promotes intestinal health.  Many doctors advise taking 400 mg of glutamine, 4 times per day, for preventing Crohn’s disease symptoms.

Please tell us…

Do you have Crohn’s disease?  If so, do you agree with these dietary recommendations?  Do you use any vitamins that are not included in this list?  Have you tested for vitamin deficiency, including vitamin B12 anemia?

Do you have any questions or suggestions?  Please leave your comments below.

Share with your friends!

If you found this article helpful, then please share with your friends, family, and coworkers by email, Facebook, or Google+.

Read more about Crohn’s and vitamin B12:

Gastrointestinal Surgery for Crohn’s (IBD) and B12 Warnings

101 Helpful Sites for Kids ‘n Teens with Crohn’s (and their Parents)

Crohn’s- 9 Irritable Bowel Disease (IBD) Myths to Ignore

Sources:

Crohn’s disease

10 Vitamins You May Need if You Have Crohn’s

10 Herbs and Vitamins That Are Good for Your Gut

Images: Lori Greig, cohdra, bradley j


9 Vitamin Deficiencies and the People who are affected by them

Tuesday, February 7th, 2012

 

 

Rickets and scurvy aren’t the only types of vitamin deficiencies; many vitamin deficiencies such as vitamin B12 deficiency (eg: pernicious anemia) and vitamin D deficiency cause debilitating symptoms like nerve damage, depression, heart disease, and memory loss.  In some cases, you can develop a vitamin deficiency even while eating a healthy diet of lean meats, vegetables, and low-fat dairy foods.

9 VITAMIN DEFICIENCIES AND THE PEOPLE WHO ARE AFFECTED BY THEM, B12 PATCH

Vitamin A (Retinol) deficiency

Vitamin A is a fat-soluble nutrient that can be found in animal-based products and plant-based foods like Romaine lettuce, carrots, yams, cantaloupe, and peaches.  Vitamin A is crucial for supporting eye health, sustaining cellular and tissue health, and promoting normal prenatal development.

In today’s age, vitamin A deficiency is rare.  Unless you specifically avoid eating foods that contain vitamin A and beta-carotene, you will probably not get this vitamin deficiency.

Symptoms of vitamin A deficiency are:

  • Dry eyes
  • Skin rashes
  • Night blindness
  • Diarrhea

People at risk for vitamin A deficiency are:

  • Alcoholics
  • People who are not able to digest fat due to an illness; individuals with celiac disease, cystic fibrosis, or cholestasis should have their vitamin A levels checked routinely.

Vitamin B1 (Thiamine) deficiency

Thiamine is a B vitamin that is essential for good stamina, enhancing muscle tone, and sustaining a healthy nervous system.  Thiamine deficiency correlates with Beriberi disease, a rare illness that causes gastrointestinal disorders, peripheral neuropathy, heart disease, and muscular pain.

Symptoms of vitamin B1 deficiency are:

  • Fatigue
  • Depression
  • Stomach cramps
  • Difficulty digesting carbohydrates

People at risk for vitamin B1 deficiency are:

  • People from countries who eat polished white rice that has been stripped of nutritious rice bran as a staple food item
  • Pregnant or lactating mothers
  • People with chronic diarrhea
  • People with liver disease
  • Alcoholics

9 Conditions that Mimic Fibromyalgia and Vitamin B12 Deficiency

Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin) deficiency

Vitamin B2 deficiency is almost unheard of in of itself.  Usually, is somebody has vitamin B1 deficiency, they are also suffering from various other nutritional deficiencies at the same time, such as vitamin D deficiency and vitamin B12 deficiency.

Symptoms of vitamin B2 deficiency are:

  • Fatigue
  • Stomach problems
  • Painful cracks and sores at the corners of your mouth
  • Tired eyes
  • Swollen tongue
  • Sore throat
  • Hypersensitivity to light

People at risk for vitamin B2 deficiency are:

  • People from poorer populations or underdeveloped countries who do not have access to nutritionally dense foods
  • Alcoholics
  • People with chronic diarrhea, such as Crohn’s disease

9 VITAMIN DEFICIENCIES AND THE PEOPLE WHO ARE AFFECTED BY THEM, B12 PATCH

Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine) deficiency

Vitamin B6 is one of many essential B vitamins; vitamin B6 aids in cognitive development and maintaining the nervous system. Vitamins B6, B12, and B9 work together to maintain already healthy homocysteine levels for cardiovascular health.

Symptoms of vitamin B6 deficiency are

  • Muscular feebleness
  • Memory loss
  • Depression
  • Difficulty concentrating

Vitamin B6 is rare, but the following individuals are sometimes at risk:

  • The elderly
  • Pregnant women
  • Women taking oral birth control

Vitamin B9 (Folic acid) deficiency

Folic acid, or folate, is a B vitamin that is crucial for production of DNA and RNA during fetal development, infancy, and adolescence.  Folic acid also works together with vitamin B12 to produce red blood cells and assist in iron absorption.

Symptoms of vitamin B9 deficiency are:

  • Fatigue
  • Sore tongue
  • Gum disease
  • Shortness of breath
  • Diarrhea
  • Short-term memory loss
  • Reduced appetite

People at risk for vitamin B9 deficiency are:

  • Alcoholics
  • Pregnant women
  • People with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)
  • People with celiac disease

9 VITAMIN DEFICIENCIES AND THE PEOPLE WHO ARE AFFECTED BY THEM, B12 PATCH

Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin) deficiency

Vitamin B12 is a water-soluble B vitamin that occurs in animal-based foods like beef, chicken, fish, shellfish, eggs, cheese, and milk.  Vitamin B12 is essential for energy, healthy DNA, red blood cell production, cognitive functioning, and a health nervous system.  Vitamin B12 deficiency differs from other kinds of malnourishment in that it can occur even when nutritional guidelines for vitamin B12 consumption are being met.

Symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency are:

  • Fatigue
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Short-term memory loss
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Painful tingling in the hands and feet
  • Sore, red tongue
  • Frequent clumsiness and stumbling

People at risk for vitamin B12 deficiency are:

  • Individuals who eat a vegan diet
  • Diabetics taking metformin
  • GERD sufferers or pregnant women taking protein pump inhibitors (PPIs)
  • People with pernicious anemia who lack intrinsic factor
  • People who suffer from gastrointestinal symptoms, such as Crohn’s disease, colitis, migraines, fibromyalgia, gluten intolerance, or celiac disease
  • People who have had gastric bypass surgery
  • Any individuals who have had surgery involving the removal of the ileum
  • The elderly
  • Alcoholics

9 VITAMIN DEFICIENCIES AND THE PEOPLE WHO ARE AFFECTED BY THEM, B12 PATCH


Vitamin C (Ascorbic acid) deficiency

Vitamin C is a water-soluble vitamin found in tomatoes, citrus fruits, broccoli, and potatoes. Vitamin C is helpful in growing cell tissue to seal wounds, promoting a defense against free radicals, and for maintaining healthy bones and teeth.  Long ago, vitamin C deficiency caused scurvy, which caused swollen bleeding gums, fatigue, and lowered immune system.

Symptoms of vitamin C deficiency are:

  • Dry hair
  • Gingivitis
  • Dry, flaking skin
  • Slow healing from wounds and bruises
  • Nosebleeds
  • Proneness to infections

People who are at risk for vitamin C deficiency are:

  • Cigarette smokers

Vitamin D deficiency

Vitamin D is a fat-soluble nutrient that is stored in your body and produced with exposure to sunlight.  Vitamin D is essential for aiding calcium in bone production and boosting your immune system.  Rickets is caused by vitamin D deficiency in children.  Other illnesses linked with vitamin D deficiency are osteoporosis, obesity, hypertension, seasonal affective disorder (SAD), diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and heart disease.

Symptoms of long-term vitamin D deficiency are:

  • 9 VITAMIN DEFICIENCIES AND THE PEOPLE WHO ARE AFFECTED BY THEM, B12 PATCHDepression
  • Weak bones
  • Frequent stumbling
  • High blood pressure

People at risk for vitamin D deficiency are:

  • People who live in cold, rainy northern countries with little exposure to sunlight
  • People of dark skin color
  • Infants
  • People who cover their bodies completely with dark garments, even while outdoors
  • The elderly

Vitamin E deficiency

Vitamin E is a fatty antioxidant that occurs in many foods and oils. Vitamin E is essential for promoting cardiovascular health, cellular functioning, and red blood cell production.

Symptoms of vitamin E deficiency are:

  • Muscular feebleness
  • Irregular eye movements
  • Visual impairment
  • Frequent stumbling

People at risk for vitamin E deficiency are:

  • Individuals with cystic fibrosis, pancreatitis, and cholestasis who cannot digest fat molecules

Please tell us…

Have you been suffering from severe fatigue, memory loss, and general loss of energy?

Has this been building up for months, or years?

If so, you might have vitamin B12 deficiency.

Please share this article with your friends- spread the love!

Read more about vitamin B12 deficiency:

Balance your B12, Balance your Nerves

Vitamin B12 Deficiency and Movement Disorders- How They Relate

Lupus and Vitamin B12 Deficiency- What’s the Connection?

Sources:

Complementary and Alternative Medicine Index (CAM)

Images, from top:

gamene, LifeSupercharger, sushi♥ina, andi.vs.zf, Pink Sherbet Photography

Vitamin Deficiencies can drive you Crazy- Seriously! Part 2

Tuesday, October 11th, 2011

 

 

Vitamins that benefit people with schizophrenia or bipolar: For some who suffer depression, anxiety disorder, or symptoms of schizophrenia, vitamin deficiencies, such as vitamin B12 deficiency or low vitamin D may be an influencing factor. In several studies, scientists have noted profound results when patients of behavioral health disorders such as bipolar, clinical depression, or schizophrenia were supplemented with vitamin B12 and vitamin D.

VITAMIN DEFICIENCIES CAN DRIVE YOU CRAZY- SERIOUSLY! PART 2, WWW.VITAMINB12PATCH.COM

Bipolar disorder (manic depression)

People diagnosed with bipolar disorder alternate between feelings of extreme depression (sadness) and episodes of mania (manic excitement).  Scientists are unsure as to the exact cause of bipolar depression, but health experts recommend the following actions for optimum cognitive health benefits:

  • Visit your doctor and request a vitamin B12 deficiency screening. In a case report reference in PubMed, vitamin B12 deficiency in one patient was spotted as an influencing factor for mood disorders.  Patients showing symptoms such as mania, severe depression, delusion, dementia and mood swings benefited greatly following one week’s supplementation of vitamin B12 (Cobalamin).
  • Increase your intake of healthy Omega-3 fatty acids, for optimum brain functioning.  Include at least two fish meals every week, use oils with Omega-3 for cooking, and supplement with flax seed oil or fish oil capsules.
  • Always monitor your blood sugar levels.  Consuming large amounts of sugar at one time causes a spike in blood sugar that has a direct effect on your mood.  For some people, this effect manifests itself in severe emotional highs and low that may simulate symptoms of manic-depressive disorder.
  • Take magnesium supplements, which relaxes the muscles and promotes a peaceful state of mind.  Additionally, scientists have noted a high incidence of magnesium deficiency in patients suffering depression and anxiety.

VITAMIN DEFICIENCIES CAN DRIVE YOU CRAZY- SERIOUSLY! PART 2, WWW.VITAMINB12PATCH.COM

Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia patients experience symptoms like hallucinations, delusions, disorientation, emotional apathy, difficulty concentrating, and problems remembering things.  A series of psychiatric tests are required in order to diagnose schizophrenia, but scientific studies have noted a high incidence of vitamin deficiencies.

  • Vitamin B12 deficiency creates symptoms similar to those found in mental disorders such as schizophrenia- mood swings, paranoia, disorientation, memory loss, hallucinations, and depression occur among people with severe vitamin B12 deficiency and schizophrenia, as well.
  • Vitamin D deficiency- According to the Vitamin D Council, vitamin D supplementation sustains a balanced mood, reduces stress, and benefits your body’s response to anti-psychotic medications.
  • Zinc and vitamin B6 supplements were the focus of a study on pyroluria, a condition that affects half of all schizophrenics.  Pyroluria causes learning disorders, feelings of apathy, chronic fatigue, and hyperactivity. In the study, patients benefited dramatically when given supplements of vitamin B6 and zinc.

VITAMIN DEFICIENCIES CAN DRIVE YOU CRAZY- SERIOUSLY! PART 2, WWW.VITAMINB12PATCH.COM

Related Reading:

Vitamin Deficiencies can drive you Crazy- Seriously!  Part 1

B12 Deficiency: Don’t Ignore the Symptoms

Teen Mental Illness: Unnoticed, Undiagnosed in America


Sources:

Vitamin D and Schizophrenia- Vitamin D Council

VITAMIN D DEFICIENCY WIDESPREAD DURING PREGNANCY, INCREASING SCHIZOPHRENIA RISK IN CHILDREN

Zinc supplements can help treat depression, ADHD, schizophrenia and other mental health problems

Bipolar Disorder or manic depression including the symptoms can be influenced by nutrition – Food for the Brain

Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Psychotic Symptoms in Adolescents- Internal Medicine News

Psychiatric manifestations of vitamin B12 deficiency: a case report- PubMed – NCBI

Vitamin Deficiencies and Depression- About.com

Images:

star5112, Dean812, Caste.


Vitamin Deficiencies can drive you Crazy- Seriously! Part 1

Monday, October 10th, 2011

 

 

Vitamins that benefit people with schizophrenia or bipolar: For some who suffer depression, anxiety disorder, or symptoms of schizophrenia, vitamin deficiencies, such as vitamin B12 deficiency or low vitamin D may be an influencing factor. In several studies, scientists have noted profound results when patients of behavioral health disorders such as bipolar, clinical depression, or schizophrenia were supplemented with vitamin B12 and vitamin D.

VITAMIN DEFICIENCIES CAN DRIVE YOU CRAZY- SERIOUSLY! PART 1, WWW,VITAMINB12PATCH.COM

VITAMIN DEFICIENCIES CAN DRIVE YOU CRAZY- SERIOUSLY! PART 1, WWW,VITAMINB12PATCH.COMDepression

People diagnosed with severe depression experience deep feelings of sadness, isolation, helplessness, and despair, in addition to difficulty sleeping, fatigue, and bodily aches.

  • Vitamin B12 deficiency- One of the symptoms of prolonged vitamin B12 deficiency is depression. For that reason, people with low B12 levels are sometimes misdiagnosed with severe depressive disorder, and given antidepressants as the sole treatment, when they would benefit greatly from vitamin B12 supplements, as well.  One quick blood test will determine if you have vitamin B12 deficiency. Following routine vitamin B12 supplementation, most patients start to see a decrease in deficiency symptoms, and notice an increase in stamina, mental focus, and overall sense of well-being.
  • Zinc Deficiency, as reported in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, occurs often among people with ADHD and depression.  Zinc is essential for healthy nerves, mood, and cognitive functioning.  According to the US RDA, adults need approximately 8-11 milligrams of zinc  each day. Zinc occurs naturally in meat, shellfish, and whole grains.
  • Vitamin D deficiency in linked with Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), a condition that causes feelings of deep depression. This explains why many people become more depressed in the winter, as daylight hours decrease and natural exposure to vitamin D in sunlight plummets.  Also, among cultures that necessitate the wearing of full-body coverings, increased risk of vitamin D deficiency and depression have been observed.  For treatment of vitamin defiency, ask your physician for a blood test, and request vitamin D supplements.

Anxiety disorder

People diagnosed with severe anxiety disorder experience symptoms such as nervous or obsessive thoughts, heart palpitations, sweating, dizziness, and panic caused by adrenaline release.  Antidepressants are helpful in most cases, but doctors have also noticed benefit with vitamin supplementation.

  • Vitamin B complex; vitamin B deficiency occurs with excessive use of alcohol, tobacco, sugar, and caffeine, consumption of which increase with high stress levels. It is crucial end (or at least limit) your exposure to harmful chemicals, such as nicotine and alcohol. Also, taking regular vitamin B complex supplements is helpful for maintaining a healthy nervous system and promoting feelings of well-being.
  • Vitamin B12 deficiency also creates feelings of anxiety in its sufferers.  There is no upper limit for vitamin B12, so if you experience any symptoms of vitamin deficiency, you may begin taking over-the-counter (OTC) vitamin B12 immediately without prescription.

VITAMIN DEFICIENCIES CAN DRIVE YOU CRAZY- SERIOUSLY! PART 1, WWW,VITAMINB12PATCH.COM

Related reading:

Signs and Symptoms of 6 Types of Anemia Blood Disease

12 Ways to Avoid Alzheimer’s Disease

Rheumatoid Arthritis Stinks- 4 Facts about Depression and Pain

7 Reasons You Have Brain Fog…And What to do About It

Sources:

Vitamin D and Mental Health

Zinc supplements can help treat depression, ADHD, schizophrenia and other mental health problems

Vitamin D Council- Health conditions- Mental health and learning disorders- Depression

Vitamins: Busy B’s- Psychology Today

Vitamin Deficiencies and Depression- About.com

Images courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net, @alviseni

Poor Diet Leads to Anemia for Postmenopausal Women, Research Confirms

Sunday, March 27th, 2011

A recent study confirms that eating a poor diet diet for postmenopausal women can lead to anemia.

http://www.morguefile.com/creative/puravida

In this US study of the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI), 93,67  older women between the ages of 50 and 79 were tested for vitamin deficiencies. Researchers found that postmenopausal women who were deficient in one vitamin were 21% more likely to have anemia, while the risk for developing anemia in older women who had a vitamin deficiency of 3 minerals increased by 44%.

According to the April issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, older women with with anemia eat less vitamins like vitamin B12, folate, vitamin C and iron; they also consume less protein, in particular red meat, which is an essential source of vitamin B12.

Read Pregnant Moms and Low B-12 Levels: Let ‘em Eat Steak!

  • Caucasians were least likely to consume proper nutrition, according to this study, demonstrating a rate of only 7.4 %, where other racial groups ranged from a 14%-15% likelihood to be consuming a poor diet which would ultimately lead to symptoms of anemia.
  • Other factors which contribute to symptoms of anemia in women include age, body mass index and smoking.
  • A high correlation exists between anemia and increased risk for premature death; anemia reduces one’s ability for physical exertion and increases one’s likelihood to be hospitalized for injuries resulting from falls.
  • Vitamin B12 deficiency can lead to pernicious anemia, but may be averted by vitamin B12 supplements.

Says Cynthia A. Thomson, associate professor of nutritional sciences at the University of Arizona and author of this study, “Additional efforts to regularly evaluate postmenopausal women for anemia should be considered and should be accompanied by an assessment of dietary intake to determine adequacy of intake of anemia-associated nutrients, including iron, vitamin B12 and folate.”

Sources:

BusinessWeek, Journal of the American Dietetic Association, abc7.c0m, Medscape, Medical News Today, Top News

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B12 Patch